The Esoteric Encyclopedia

New Clear Temple of Knowledge:


Esoteric Encyclopedia:

(Under Construction)

2012 Phenomenon:

The 2012 phenomenon was a range of eschatological beliefs that cataclysmic or transformative events would occur on or around 21 December 2012. This date was regarded as the end-date of a 5,126-year-long cycle in the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, and as such, festivities to commemorate the date took place on 21 December 2012 in the countries that were part of the Mayan civilization (Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador), with main events at Chichén Itzá in Mexico, and Tikal in Guatemala. Various astronomical alignments and numerological formulae were proposed as pertaining to this date, all unequivocally rejected by all scholarship. A New Age interpretation held that the date marked the start of a period during which Earth and its inhabitants would undergo a positive physical or spiritual transformation, and that 21 December 2012 would mark the beginning of a new era. Others suggested that the date marked the end of the world or a similar catastrophe. Scenarios suggested for the end of the world included the arrival of the next solar maximum, an interaction between Earth and the black hole at the center of the galaxy, or Earth’s collision with a planet called Nibiru. Scholars from various disciplines quickly dismissed predictions of concomitant cataclysmic events as they arose. Professional Mayanist scholars stated that no extant classic Maya accounts forecast impending doom, and that the idea that the Long Count calendar ends in 2012 misrepresented Maya history and culture, while astronomers rejected the various proposed doomsday scenarios as pseudoscience, easily refuted by elementary astronomical observations.

Acupuncture:

Acupuncture is a collection of procedures involving penetration of the skin with needles to stimulate certain points on the body. In its classical form it is a characteristic component of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It has been categorized as a complementary health approach. According to traditional Chinese medicine, stimulating specific acupuncture points corrects imbalances in the flow of qi through channels known as meridians. Scientific investigation has not found any histological or physiological correlates for traditional Chinese concepts such as qi, meridians, and acupuncture points, and some contemporary practitioners use acupuncture without following the traditional Chinese approach. Although minimally invasive, the puncturing of the skin with acupuncture needles poses problems when designing trials that adequately control for placebo effect. A number of studies comparing traditional acupuncture to sham procedures found that both sham and traditional acupuncture were superior to usual care but were themselves equivalent. These findings are apparently at odds with traditional Chinese theories regarding acupuncture point specificity. 

Adamite:

Adamite connects emotions with the heart. It allows us to identify and deal with emotional issues, especially those that affect our reactions to any given circumstance. Adamite provides clarity and strength as these issues are faced. When holding Adamite, a feeling of warmth and safety may be present. Adamite instills left-brain thinking and encourages you to explore new opportunities, especially business ventures. Those who are drawn to water will also be drawn to Adamite, as it is as soothing and cool as a fresh water stream.

Agartha:

Agartha (sometimes Agartta, Agharti, Agarta or Agarttha) is a legendary city that is said to reside in the earth’s core. It is related to the belief in a hollow earth and is a popular subject in esotericism. Agartha is frequently associated or confused with Shambhala, which figures prominently in Vajrayana Buddhism and Tibetan Kalachakra teachings and revived in the West by Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society. Theosophists in particular regard Agarthi as a vast complex of caves underneath Tibet inhabited by evil demons called asurasHelena and Nicholas Roerich, whose teachings closely parallel Theosophy, see Shambhala’s existence as both spiritual and physical.

Agate:

This is THE stone everyone should have for protection. This group of stones are variegated chalcedony. (see also moss agate, eye agate) The agate is one of the oldest stones in recorded history.

Agates attract strength. Agate is a protection from bad dreams. It also protects from stress and energy drains. Agates have been used in jewelry since Biblical Babylonian times. They were used to ward off storms. They were prized gems in antiquity. The agates with banded colors were placed at the head of a sleeper to give rich and varied dreams. Agates have been thought to be good to harden the gums.

Agnosticism:

Agnosticism is the view that the truth values of certain claims—especially claims about the existence or non-existence of any deity, as well as other religious and metaphysical claims—are unknown or unknowable. According to the philosopher William L. Rowe, in the popular sense, an agnostic is someone who neither believes nor disbelieves in the existence of a deity or deities, whereas a theist and an atheist believe and disbelieve, respectively. Thomas Henry Huxley, an English biologist, coined the word agnostic in 1869. However, earlier thinkers have written works that promoted agnostic points of view. These thinkers include Sanjaya Belatthaputta, a 5th-century BCE Indian philosopher who expressed agnosticism about any afterlife, Protagoras, a 5th-century BCE Greek philosopher was agnostic about the gods. The Nasadiya Sukta in the Rigveda is agnostic about the origin of the universe. Since the time that Huxley coined the term, many other thinkers have extensively written about agnosticism.

Aix en Provence Possessions:

The Aix-en-Provence possessions were a series of alleged cases of demonic possession occurring among the Ursuline nuns of Aix-en-Provence (South of France) in 1611. Father Louis Gaufridi was accused and convicted of causing the possession by a pact with the devil, and he was executed by being burned at the stake, atop a pile of bushes because they burned slower and hotter than logs. This case provided the legal precedent for the conviction and execution of Urbain Grandier at Loudun more than 20 years later. In both cases, sexual themes dominated the manifestations of the possessions.

Alchemy:

Alchemy is an influential philosophical tradition whose practitioners have, from antiquity, claimed it to be the precursor to profound powers. The defining objectives of alchemy are varied, but historically have typically included one or more of the following goals: the creation of the fabled philosopher’s stone; the ability to transform base metals into the noble metals (gold or silver); and development of an elixir of life, which would confer youth and longevity.

Alchemy differs significantly from modern science in its inclusion of Hermetic principles and practices related to mythologymagicreligion, and spirituality. It is recognized as a protoscience that contributed to the development of modern chemistry and medicine. Alchemists developed a structure of basic laboratory techniques, theory, terminology, and experimental method, some of which are still in use today.

Alexandre Saint-Yves d’Alveydre:

Published the first “reliable” account of Agartha in Europe. According to him, the secret world of “Agartha” and all of its wisdom and wealth “will be accessible for all mankind, when Christianity lives up to the commandments which were once drafted by Moses and Jesus,” meaning “When the Anarchy which exists in our world is replaced by the Synarchy.” Saint-Yves gives a “lively” description of “Agartha” in this book as if it were a place which really exists, situated in the Himalayas in Tibet. Saint-Yves’ version of the history of “Agartha” is based upon “revealed” information, meaning received by Saint-Yves himself through “attunement.”[citation needed] The explorer Ferdynand Ossendowski wrote a book in 1922 titled Beasts, Men and Gods. In the book, Ossendowski tells of a story which was imparted to him concerning a subterranean kingdom which exists inside the earth. This kingdom was known to the Buddhists as Agharti.

Alexandrite:

Alexandrite is a very rare stone. It was named after Alexander II of Russia as it was found on his Coming of Age Day.

Alexandrite has an unusual phenomenon – it changes color!. The finest alexandrite is a bright green but when put in candlelight or any reddish light, the stone changes to a bright red.

Alexandrite is said to stimulate pleasure and love. It is also used as a lucky stone.

Alpha Centauri:

Alpha Centauri (α Centauri, α Cen; also known as Rigil Kent /ˈraɪdʒəl ˈkɛnt/—see Names) is the brightest star in the southern constellation of Centaurus, and the third brightest star in the night sky. The Alpha Centauri system is located 1.34 parsecs or 4.37 light years from the Sun, making it the closest star system to the Solar System. Although it appears to the unaided eye as a single object, Alpha Centauri is actually a binary star system (designated Alpha Centauri AB or α Cen AB) whose combined visual magnitude of −0.27 makes it the third brightest star (other than the Sun) seen from Earth after the −1.46 magnitude Sirius and the −0.72 magnitude Canopus.

 

Amazonite:

This semi-opaque blue-green variety of feldspar is named after the Amazon River.

Amazonite balances feminine and masculine energy. It promotes kindness and practicality. It is an excellent stone for artists and for men.

Pale azure blue amazonite is know as the lucky “Hope Stone”. It will be lucky for all your hopes and dreams. Amazonite is blue-green to pale green stone in the feldspar group. It comes mainly from United States and Australia.

Amber:

Amber opens and cleanses the third chakra. Amber allows the body to heal itself by absorbing and transmuting negative energy into positive energy. It emits a sunny and bright soothing energy, which helps to calm nerves and enliven ones disposition. Amber is used on the different chakras for opening and cleansing. It is used for connection of the conscious self to universal perfection. It helps to bring what is desired to the state of reality. It stimulates the mind and opens up the crown chakra. It transmutes the energy of physical vitality towards the activation of unconditional love. Amber helps in the realization and subsequent response of choice, helping one to choose as well as to be chosen. It has been used as a symbol for renewal of marriage vows and to assure promises. It has been used to bring good luck to warriors. It’s a sacred stone to Eastern Indians as well as Native Americans. It has been used in fire ceremonies of ancient tribal healers. It was burned in the medieval days as a fumigant and incense to clear the environment of negative energy. It was used in the breastplates of high priest. It aligns the ethereal energies to the physical, emotional and mental bodies, providing for and even flow of perfect order to the requirements of the Earth plane while balancing the electromagnetics of the physical body. It cleanses the environment in which it rest and is an excellent mineral for use in purifying birthing and re-birthing rooms. It also can purify one’s body, mind and spirit when worn, carried or used in an elixir.

Amethyst:

Crystalline quartz in shades of purple, lilac or mauve is called amethyst, a stone traditionally worn to guard against drunkeness and to instill a sober mind. The word amethyst comes from the Greek meaning “without drunkenness” and amethyst is believed to protect one from poison.

Ametrine:

Ametrine is a rare and unusual stone which occurs in quartz when amethyst and citrine reside in the same crystal. Because the color zoning effect is natural, no two ametrines will ever be exactly alike.

Amulet:

An amulet (Latin amuletum) can be any object but its most important characteristic is its alleged power to protect its owner from danger or harm. Amulets are different from talismans as a talisman is believed to bring luck or some other benefit, though it can offer protection as well. Amulets are often confused with pendants—charms that hang from necklaces—any given pendant may indeed be an amulet, but so may any other charm which purports to protect its owner from danger. Potential amulets include gems, especially engraved gems, statues, coins, drawings, pendants, rings, plants and animals; even words in the form of a magical spell or incantation to repel evil or bad luck. The word “amulet” comes from the Latin amuletum; the earliest extant use of the term is in Pliny’s Natural History, meaning “an object that protects a person from trouble”.

Anarchist Superstar:

Brave sagacious souls who aren’t afraid to rage against the machine, and value principle over party.

Ancient Astronaut (Alien) Theory:

Ancient astronauts or ancient aliens, also known as paleocontact hypothesis, is a pseudo-scientific theory that states intelligent extraterrestrial beings have visited Earth in antiquity or prehistory and made contact with humans. Proponents suggest that this contact influenced the development of human cultures, technologies, and religions. A common claim is that deities from most, if not all, religions are actually extraterrestrials, and their advanced technologies were wrongly understood by primitive men as evidence of their divine status.

 

Angel Energy Alchemy™:

An Angel Energy Alchemy™ intuitive reading is a doorway into the divine. Founded by Krista-Lynn Landolfi this medium of reading will bring through messages from your Angelic Assistance Team, providing you with answers, direction, and divine guidance. 

The angels know who you are and why you were born, and will constantly remind you of your Holy Purpose. Fears and worries can block the reception of heaven’s messages.

Anarchy:

Anarchy has more than one definition. Some use the term “anarchy” to refer to a society without a publicly enforced government. When used in this sense, anarchy may or may not be intended to imply political disorder or lawlessness within a society. Many anarchists complain with Anselme Bellegarrigue that “[v]ulgar error has taken ‘anarchy’ to be synonymous with ‘civil war.'”

Annunaki:

The Anunnaki (also transcribed as: Anunna, Anunnaku, Ananaki and other variations) are a group of deities in ancient Mesopotamian cultures (i.e. Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian). The name is variously written “da-nuna”, “da-nuna-ke4-ne”, or “da-nun-na”, meaning something to the effect of “those of royal blood” or “princely offspring”. According to The Oxford Companion to World Mythology, the Anunnaki “are the Sumerian deities of the old primordial line; they are chthonic deities of fertility, associated eventually with the underworld, where they became judges. They take their name from the old sky god An (Anu).

 

Anthroposophy:

Anthroposophy, a philosophy founded by Rudolf Steiner, postulates the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world accessible to direct experience through inner development. More specifically, it aims to develop faculties of perceptive imagination, inspiration and intuition through cultivating a form of thinking independent of sensory experience, and to present the results thus derived in a manner subject to rational verification. In its investigations of the spiritual world, anthroposophy aims to attain the precision and clarity attained by the natural sciences in their investigations of the physical world.

Anthroposophical ideas have been applied practically in many areas including Steiner/Waldorf educationspecial education (most prominently through the Camphill Movement),agriculturemedicineethical bankingorganizational development, and the arts. The Anthroposophical Society has its international center at the Goetheanum in DornachSwitzerland.

Apatheism:

Apatheism, also known as pragmatic atheism or (critically) as practical atheism, is acting with apathy, disregard, or lack of interest towards belief or disbelief in a deity. Apatheism describes the manner of acting towards a belief or lack of a belief in a deity, so it applies to both theism and atheism. An apatheist is also someone who is not interested in accepting or denying any claims that gods exist or do not exist. In other words, an apatheist is someone who considers the question of the existence of gods as neither meaningful nor relevant to their life. Apathetic agnosticism (also called pragmatic agnosticism) claims that no amount of debate can prove or disprove the existence of one or more deities, and if one or more deities exist, they do not appear to be concerned about the fate of humans. Therefore, their existence has little to no impact on personal human affairs and should be of little theological interest. Apatheists hold that if it were possible to prove that God does or does not exist, their behavior would not change.

Aquarius:

Aquarius is the eleventh astrological sign in the Zodiac, originating from the constellation Aquarius.

Under the tropical zodiac, the sun is in Aquarius typically between January 20 to February 18, while under the Sidereal Zodiac, the sun is in Aquarius from approximately February 15 to March 14, depending on leap year.

Learn more about the personality traits of Aquarius at Astrology.com.

Archon:

In Gnostic cosmology, Archons are a species of inorganic beings that emerged in the solar system prior to the formation of the earth.

They are cyborgs inhabiting the planetary system (exclusive of the earth, sun and moon), which is described as a virtual world (stereoma) they construct by imitating the geometric forms emanated from the Pleroma, the realm of the Generators, the Cosmic Gods.

The Archons are a genuine species with their own proper habitat, and may even be considered to be god-like, but they lack intentionality (ennoia: self-directive capacity), and they have a nasty tendency to stray from their boundaries and intrude on the human realm. Archons are said to feel intense envy toward humanity because we possess the intentionality they lack

The Gaia Mythos describes how the Archons were produced by fractal impact in the dense elementary field arrays (dema) of the galactic limbs, when the Aeon Sophia plunged unilaterally from the galactic core. See especially Episode 10.

This event is also described in detail in Alien Dreaming.

Aries:

The first astrological sign in the Zodiac, spanning the first 30 degrees of celestial longitude. Under the tropical zodiac, the Sun transits this constellation between March 21 to April 20 each year. Under the sidereal zodiac, the sun currently transits Aries from 15 April to 15 May (approximately). According to the Tropical system of astrology, the Sun enters the sign of Aries when it reaches the northern vernal equinox, which occurs around March 21. Due to the fact that the Earth takes approximately 365.25 days to go around the Sun, the precise time of the equinox is not the same each year, and generally will occur about 6 hours later each year, with a jump of a day (backwards) on leap years. Since 1900 the vernal equinox date ranged from March 20 at 08h (2000) to March 21 at 19h (1903) (all times UTC). Individuals born during these dates, depending on which system of astrology they subscribe to, may be called Arians or Ariens.

Read more about the personality traits of Aries at Astrology.com.

Atheism:

Atheism is, in a broad sense, the rejection of belief in the existence of deities. In a narrower sense, atheism is specifically the position that there are no deities. Most inclusively, atheism is the absence of belief that any deities exist. Atheism is contrasted with theism, which in its most general form is the belief that at least one deity exists. The term atheism originated from the Greek ἄθεος (atheos), meaning “without god(s)”, used as a pejorative term applied to those thought to reject the gods worshipped by the larger society. With the spread of freethought, skeptical inquiry, and subsequent increase in criticism of religion, application of the term narrowed in scope. The first individuals to identify themselves using the word “atheist” lived in the 18th century. Arguments for atheism range from the philosophical to social and historical approaches. Rationales for not believing in any supernatural deity include the lack of empirical evidence, the problem of evil, the argument from inconsistent revelations, rejection of concepts which cannot be falsified, and the argument from nonbelief. Although some atheists have adopted secular philosophies, there is no one ideology or set of behaviors to which all atheists adhere. Many atheists hold that atheism is a more parsimonious worldview than theism, and therefore the burden of proof lies not on the atheist to disprove the existence of God, but on the theist to provide a rationale for theism. Atheism is accepted within some religious and spiritual belief systems, including Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Raelism, Neopagan movements such as Wicca, and nontheistic religions. 

Ayahuasca:

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Ayahuasca,, also commonly called yagé  is a psychedelic brew of various plant infusions prepared with the Banisteriopsis caapi vine. It is either mixed with the leaves of dimethyltryptamine (DMT)-containing species of shrubs from the genus Psychotria or with the leaves of the Justicia pectoralis plant which does not contain DMT. The brew, first described academically in the early 1950s by Harvard ethnobotanist Richard Evans Schultes, who found it employed for divinatory and healing purposes by the native peoples of Amazonian Peru, is known by a number of different names (see below).

It has been reported that some effects can be felt from consuming the caapi vine alone, but that DMT-containing plants (such as Psychotria) remain inactive when drunk as a brew without a source of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as B. caapi. How indigenous peoples discovered the synergistic properties of the plants used in the ayahuasca brew remains unclear. Many indigenous Amazonian people say they received the instructions directly from plants and plant spirits.

December 22 – January 19

Capricorn, the tenth sign of the zodiac, is all about hard work. Those born under this sign are more than happy to put in a full day at the office, realizing that it will likely take a lot of those days to get to the top. That’s no problem, since Capricorns are both ambitious and determined: they will get there. Life is one big project for these folks, and they adapt to this by adopting a businesslike approach to most everything they do. Capricorns are practical as well, taking things one step at a time and being as realistic and pragmatic as possible. The Capricorn-born are extremely dedicated to their goals, almost to the point of stubbornness. Those victories sure smell sweet, though, and that thought alone will keep Capricorns going.

Celestine:

Celestite, also known as Celestine, is revered for its high frequency and Divine energies, and is known as a powerful healing crystal. Celestite has been called a “teacher for the New Age”, as it will connect one with the Angelic realms, allowing for the free-flow of these higher frequencies into the Crown and Third-Eye Chakras, and also down into the Throat Chakra for expression. Bringing mental calm and clarity in the midst of any chaotic circumstance, Celestite can allow one to easily flow through a traumatic period and still come out on top.

Chaos Magic:

Although there are a few techniques unique to chaos magic (such as some forms of sigil magic), chaos magic is often highly individualistic and borrows liberally from other belief systems, due to chaos magic having a central belief that belief is a tool. Some common sources of inspiration include such diverse areas as science fiction, scientific theories, traditional ceremonial magic, neoshamanism, Eastern philosophy, world religions, and individual experimentation. Despite tremendous individual variation, chaos magicians (sometimes called “chaotes”3) often work with chaotic and humorous paradigms, such as the worship of Hundun from Taoism or Eris from Discordianism, and it is common for chaotes to believe in whatever god suits their current paradigm and discard it when necessary. Chaotes can be agnostic or atheist and regard magical practice as merely psychological, not paranormal. Some chaos magicians also use psychedelic drugs in practices such as chemognosticism.4 Chaos magicians are often seen by other occultists as dangerous or worrisome revolutionaries.[2

Chakra:

In Hindu metaphysical and tantric/yogic traditions and other belief systems chakras are points or knots, in the subtle human body. They are located at the physical counterparts of the major plexuses of arteries, veins and nerves. Chakras are part of the subtle body, not the physical body, and as such are the meeting points of the subtle (non-physical) energy channels, called nadiis. Nadiis are channels in the subtle body through which the life force (prana), or vital energy moves. Various scriptural texts and teachings present a different number of chakras. There are many chakras in the subtle human body according to the tantric texts, but there are 6 chakras and 7th(sahasrara) is the state which are considered to be the most important ones.

1st Chakra, Muladhara (red): Located at the base of the spine, the first energy center, sometimes called “the root chakra,” relates to our most basic survival needs and our sense of belonging, whether to our family or a larger group. When this chakra is clear and energy flows through it freely, we feel secure and confident that we can easily fulfill our needs. On the other hand, blockage in this area can cause us to feel anxious and worried.

This chakra, which connects us to the earth, gives us vital information about whether actions we’re considering will nourish us or pose a threat. When we have a decision to make, we can listen to the signals of the root chakra: Uncomfortable sensations are a message to be alert and reconsider, while pleasant feelings indicate that a given course of action is likely to meet our needs for safety and nourishment.

2nd Chakra, Svadhisthana (orange):

This chakra resides in reproductive area and is associated with creativity and birth―both literally to a new baby but also metaphorically to new aspects of ourselves, projects and ideas. When this chakra is healthy, we’re tapped into the source of higher energy that helps us write beautiful music, develop an innovative business, or create a loving family life. When this chakra becomes congested, we may experience a block in our creative powers and a sense of dryness or emptiness.

3rd Chakra, Manipura (yellow):

The third chakra, which governs our will, self-esteem and sense of personal power, is located in the solar plexus. When energy flows freely through this center, we’re confident about our ability to manifest our intentions and desires. When the third chakra is blocked, however, we feel powerless and frustrated.

4th Chakra, Anahata (green):

This energy center is sometimes referred to as the “heart chakra” because it resonates in the heart and relates to compassion and love. When the fourth chakra is flowing and open, we feel deeply connected to everyone in our life. But when it’s obstructed, we experience loneliness and a sense of alienation.

5th Chakra, Vishuddha (blue):

This energy center is localized in the throat area and relates to communication and self-expression . . . the ability to voice our dreams. When our center of communication is clear, we’re able to express our truth without worrying about what others may think. In contrast, with a congested fifth chakra, we feel anxious about how other people will react to our views and are likely to censor ourselves.

6th Chakra, Ajna (indigo):

The sixth chakra, also known as the ‘brow chakra” or the “third eye” is located between the eyes. It’s the center of insight, where we integrate all the information and intuition in our life. When energy isn’t flowing easily through this chakra, we have a sense of self-doubt and distrust. When it’s open and clear, we feel deeply connected to our inner wisdom and trust that it guides us in our choices.

7th Chakra, Sahaswara (violet):

This chakra resides at the crown of the head and is therefore sometimes called the “crown chakra.” It connects us to higher consciousness and pure awareness. The seventh chakra is known as the “Thousand Petaled Lotus,” which bursts open when we remember our true nature and experience enlightenment.

The Chariot (Tarot Card):

Another view is that the mood of the card may be characterized as that of conquest. It represents a battle that can be won if the Querent has the willpower for it. The battle is usually an external one, with a clear goal and plan of action. Qualities needed to win the battle include self-reliance, righteousness, conviction and plain hard work. The steeds represent powerful forces, internal or external, that can be controlled to achieve the goal. The chariot is one of the most complex cards to define. On its most basic level, it implies war, a struggle, and an eventual, hard-won victory; either over enemies, obstacles, nature, the beasts inside you, or to just get what you want. But there is a great deal more to it. What does this all mean? It means a union of opposites, like the black and white steeds. They pull in different directions, but must be (and can be!) made to go together in one direction. Control is required over opposing emotions, wants, needs, people, or circumstances; to bring them together and give them a single direction, your direction. Confidence is also needed and, most especially, motivation. The card can, in fact, indicate new motivation or inspiration, which gets a stagnant situation moving again. It can also imply, on a more pragmatic level, a trip (usually by car), a vehicle – in the repair shop if the card comes up reversed – or a message. The Chariot is a fascinating card, but also frustrating. It is armored, but also cut off – a charioteer fights alone. It moves from one plane to the next (water to land and back again) – conscious and unconscious, earthly and spiritual. It succeeds by attacking from the side, rather than straight on. On the one hand, the Chariot may indicate loyalty, faith, and motivation; a conviction that will lead to victory no matter the odds. On the other hand, however, the Chariot may signify a ruthless, diehard desire to win at any cost. The Querent should be reminded to save his energy for what comes after. If inverted, the meaning remains the same, but the Querent is in danger of losing the battle due to a lack of control. The Chariot has many allusions to the kabbalistic Ma’asei Merkavah. According to Waite, the figures on the charioteer’s shoulders are supposed to be the Urim and Thummim which were divinatory tools often used by the Israelites for guidance during times of war. Waite describes the charioteer as conquest on all planes — in the mind, in science, in progress, and thus able to reply to the riddles of the sphinx, even though he is not of priest and thus unable to answer to the High Priestess. A. E. Waite was a key figure in the development of modern Tarot interpretations. However not all interpretations follow his theology. All Tarot decks used for divination are interpreted through personal experience and standards. Some frequent keywords are: Conquest —– Honor —– Victory —– Energy Egocentrism —– Self-confidence —– Conviction —– Anxiety Willpower —– Self-assertion —– Hard control —– Discipline Inflexibility —– Success —– Wealth —– Recognition Impulsivity —– Command —– Bravery —– Pride A powerful, princely figure sits in a swift chariot, pulled usually by two sphinxes or horses. There is often a black and white motif, for example one of the steeds may be black and the other white. The figure may be crowned or helmeted, and is winged in some representations. He or she may hold a sword or wand, or other masculine symbol. The Thoth Tarot deck has the figure controlling four different animals, representing the four elements.

The seventh trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

It has been suggested the square on the charioteer’s chest is a representation of the earth tattva.[2][2] Another view is that the mood of the card may be characterized as that of conquest. It represents a battle that can be won if the Querent has the willpower for it. The battle is usually an external one, with a clear goal and plan of action. Qualities needed to win the battle include self-reliance, righteousness, conviction and plain hard work. The steeds represent powerful forces, internal or external, that can be controlled to achieve the goal. The chariot is one of the most complex cards to define. On its most basic level, it implies war, a struggle, and an eventual, hard-won victory; either over enemies, obstacles, nature, the beasts inside you, or to just get what you want. But there is a great deal more to it. What does this all mean? It means a union of opposites, like the black and white steeds. They pull in different directions, but must be (and can be!) made to go together in one direction. Control is required over opposing emotions, wants, needs, people, or circumstances; to bring them together and give them a single direction, your direction. Confidence is also needed and, most especially, motivation. The card can, in fact, indicate new motivation or inspiration, which gets a stagnant situation moving again. It can also imply, on a more pragmatic level, a trip (usually by car), a vehicle – in the repair shop if the card comes up reversed – or a message. The Chariot is a fascinating card, but also frustrating. It is armored, but also cut off – a charioteer fights alone. It moves from one plane to the next (water to land and back again) – conscious and unconscious, earthly and spiritual. It succeeds by attacking from the side, rather than straight on. On the one hand, the Chariot may indicate loyalty, faith, and motivation; a conviction that will lead to victory no matter the odds. On the other hand, however, the Chariot may signify a ruthless, diehard desire to win at any cost. The Querent should be reminded to save his energy for what comes after. If inverted, the meaning remains the same, but the Querent is in danger of losing the battle due to a lack of control. The Chariot has many allusions to the kabbalistic Ma’asei Merkavah. According to Waite, the figures on the charioteer’s shoulders are supposed to be the Urim and Thummim which were divinatory tools often used by the Israelites for guidance during times of war. Waite describes the charioteer as conquest on all planes — in the mind, in science, in progress, and thus able to reply to the riddles of the sphinx, even though he is not of priest and thus unable to answer to the High Priestess.

A. E. Waite was a key figure in the development of modern Tarot interpretations. However not all interpretations follow his theology. All Tarot decks used for divination are interpreted through personal experience and standards. Some frequent keywords are: Conquest —– Honor —– Victory —– Energy Egocentrism —– Self-confidence —– Conviction —– Anxiety Willpower —– Self-assertion —– Hard control —– Discipline Inflexibility —– Success —– Wealth —– Recognition Impulsivity —– Command —– Bravery —– Pride A powerful, princely figure sits in a swift chariot, pulled usually by two sphinxes or horses. There is often a black and white motif, for example one of the steeds may be black and the other white. The figure may be crowned or helmeted, and is winged in some representations. He or she may hold a sword or wand, or other masculine symbol. The Thoth Tarot deck has the figure controlling four different animals, representing the four elements.

Close Encounter(s):

In ufology, a close encounter is an event in which a person witnesses an unidentified flying object. This terminology and the system of classification behind it was started by astronomer and UFO researcher J. Allen Hynek, and was first suggested in his 1972 book The UFO Experience: A Scientific Inquiry.2 He introduced the first three kinds of encounters; more sub-types of close encounters were later added by others, but these additional categories are not universally accepted by UFO researchers, mainly because they depart from the scientific rigor that Hynek aimed to bring to ufology.

Close Encounters of the First kind: Visual sightings of an unidentified flying object seemingly less than 500 feet away that show an appreciable angular extension and considerable detail.11

Close Encounters of the Second kind: A UFO event in which a physical effect is alleged. This can be interference in the functioning of a vehicle or electronic device; animals reacting; a physiological effect such as paralysis or heat and discomfort in the witness; or some physical trace like impressions in the ground, scorching or effecting vegetation, or a chemical trace.12

Close Encounters of the Third kind: UFO encounters in which an animated creature is present. These include humanoids, robots, and human who seemed to be occupants or pilots of a UFO..13

Close Encounters of the Fourth kind: Human is abducted by a UFO or its occupants.

Close Encounters of the Fifth kind: Named by Steven M. Greer’s CSETI group, these purported encounters are joint, bilateral contact events produced through the conscious, voluntary and proactive human-initiated or cooperative communication with extraterrestrial intelligence.17 This is very similar to some “contactees” of the 1950s who claimed regular communication with benevolent aliens. see CE-5 contact meditation video

Cloudbuster:

A cloudbuster (or cloud buster) is a device designed by Austrian psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich, which Reich said could produce rain by manipulating what he called “orgone energy” present in the atmosphere.2 The cloudbuster was intended to be used in a way similar to a lightning rod: focusing it on a location in the sky and grounding it in some material that was presumed to absorb orgone—such as a body of water—would draw the orgone energy out of the atmosphere, causing the formation of clouds and rain. Reich conducted dozens of experiments with the cloudbuster, calling the research “Cosmic Orgone Engineering.”2

Cymatics:

Cymatics (from Greek: κῦμα “wave”) is the study of visible sound and vibration, a subset of modal phenomena. Typically the surface of a plate, diaphragm, or membrane is vibrated, and regions of maximum and minimum displacement are made visible in a thin coating of particles, paste, or liquid.1 Different patterns emerge in the excitatory medium depending on the geometry of the plate and the driving frequency.
The apparatus employed can be simple, such as the old Chinese spouting bowl, or Chinese singing fountain, in which copper handles are rubbed and cause the copper bottom elements to vibrate. Other examples are a Chladni Plate[2] or advanced such as the CymaScope, a laboratory instrument that makes visible the inherent geometries within sound and music.

Death (XIII) (Tarot Card):

The thirteenth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in Tarot, tarock and tarocchi games as well as in divination.

Some frequent keywords used by tarot readers for the interpretation of Death are: Ending of a cycle——Loss——Conclusion——Sadness Transition into a new state——Psychological transformation Finishing up——Regeneration——Elimination of old patterns Being caught in the inescapable——Good-byes——Deep change According to Eden Gray and other authors on the subject, it is unlikely that this card actually represents a physical death. Typically it implies an end, possibly of a relationship or interest, and therefore implies an increased sense of self-awareness—not to be confused with self-consciousness or any kind of self-diminishment.[3

Demonology:

Demonology is the systematic study of demons or beliefs about demons.3 It is the branch of theology relating to superhuman beings who are not gods.[2] It deals both with benevolent beings that have no circle of worshippers or so limited a circle as to be below the rank of gods, and with malevolent beings of all kinds. The original sense of “demon”, from the time of Homer onward, was a benevolent being,[2] but in English the name now holds connotations of malevolence. (In order to keep the distinction, when referring to the word in its original Greek meaning English uses the spelling “Daemon” or “Daimon”.) Demons, when regarded as spirits, may belong to either of the classes of spirits recognized by primitive animism;[4] that is to say, they may be human, or non-human, separable souls, or discarnate spirits which have never inhabited a body. A sharp distinction is often drawn between these two classes, notably by the Melanesians, several African groups, and others; the Arab jinn, for example, are not reducible to modified human souls; at the same time these classes are frequently conceived as producing identical results, e.g. diseases.[2][2]

The Devil (Tarot Card):

The Devil (XV) is the fifteenth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The Devil is the card of self-bondage to an idea or belief which is preventing a person from growing or being healthy—an example might be a belief that getting drunk each night is good for you. On the other hand, however, it can also be a warning to someone who is too restrained and/or dispassionate and never allows him or herself to be rash or wild or ambitious, which is yet another form of enslavement.
The Devil is the 15th card of the Major Arcana, and is associated with earth and Capricorn. Though many decks portray a stereotypical Satan figure for this card, it is more accurately represented by our bondage to material things rather than by any evil persona. It also indicates an obsession or addiction to fulfilling our own earthly base desires. Should the Devil represent a person, it will most likely be one of money and power, one who is persuasive, aggressive, and controlling. In any case, it is most important that the querent understands that the ties that bind are freely worn.

Some frequent keywords used by tarot readers are:[citation needed]
Materialism —– Ignorance —– Stagnation —– Self-bondage
Lust —– Egoism —– Obsession —– Anxiety —– Anger
Hedonism —– Passion —– Instincts —– Racist
Sexuality —— Temptation —– Doubt —– Vice
Futility —– Physical attraction —– Pessimism —– Insight

Devil’s Mark (nee: Witches Mark):

According to witch-hunters during the height of the witch trials, the witches’ mark (not to be confused with a witches’ teat) indicated that an individual was a witch. The witches’ mark and the devil’s mark are all terms applied to essentially the same mark. The beliefs about the mark differ depending on the trial location and the accusation made against the witch. Evidence of the witches’ mark is found earliest in the 16th century, and reached its peak in 1645, then essentially disappeared by 1700.1 The Witch or Devil’s mark was believed to be the permanent marking of the Devil on his initiates to seal their obedience and service to him. He created the mark by raking his claw across their flesh, or by making a blue or red brand using a hot iron. Sometimes, the mark was believed to have been left by the Devil licking the individual. The Devil was thought to mark the individual at the end of nocturnal initiation rites.[2] The witches teat was a raised bump somewhere on a witches body. It is often depicted as having a wart-like appearance.

Dimensions (esoteric meaning)*:

Dimension One: to do with force and ultimate reality; the strong atomic force

Dimension Two: physical, sensory, the body, the mass of the Earth. ‘Elementals’ (or ‘chemical beings’?) live here

Dimension Three: the concrete mind, where the ego is, the surface of the earth, the usual awareness level for human beings

Dimension Four: the psyche, archetypes, attitudes, feelings; reptilians (or at least lizards), the Greys, and vampiric entities live here

Dimension Five: the ‘self’ or centre aspect of personality; creativity, joy, centredness & integrity. The Pleiadians’ dimension; snakes and lions

Dimethyltryptamine (DMT):

Dimethyltryptamine (DMT or N,N-DMT) is a compound of the tryptamine family. Its presence is widespread throughout the plant kingdom.[3][2] DMT occurs in trace amounts in mammals, including humans, where it putatively functions as a trace amine neurotransmitter/neuromodulator.[5] It is originally derived from the essential amino acid tryptophan and ultimately produced by the enzyme INMT during normal metabolism.[6] The significance of its widespread natural presence remains undetermined. DMT is structurally analogous to the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) and the hormone melatonin, and furthermore functionally analogous to other psychedelic tryptamines, such as 5-MeO-DMT, bufotenin, psilocin, and psilocybin.
When ingested, DMT acts as a psychedelic drug.[7] Depending on the dose and method of administration, its subjective effects can range from short-lived milder psychedelic states to powerful immersive experiences; these are often described as a total loss of connection to external reality and an experience of encountering indescribable spiritual/alien realms.[8] Indigenous Amazonian Amerindian cultures consume DMT as the primary psychoactive in ayahuasca, a shamanistic brew used for divinatory and healing purposes. Pharmacologically, ayahuasca combines DMT with an MAOI, an enzyme inhibitor that allows DMT to be orally active.[9]

The Dispilio Tablet:

The Dispilio tablet is a wooden tablet bearing inscribed markings, unearthed during George Hourmouziadis’s excavations of Dispilio in Greece and carbon 14-dated to about 7300 BP. It was discovered in 1993 in a Neolithic lakeshore settlement that occupied an artificial island1 near the modern village of Dispilio on Lake Kastoria in Kastoria regional unit, Greece.

Divination:

Divination (from Latin divinare “to foresee, to be inspired by a god”,[2] related to divinus, divine) is the attempt to gain insight into a question or situation by way of an occultic, standardized process or ritual.[3] Used in various forms throughout history, diviners ascertain their interpretations of how a querent should proceed by reading signs, events, or omens, or through alleged contact with a supernatural agency.
Divination can be seen as a systematic method with which to organize what appear to be disjointed, random facets of existence such that they provide insight into a problem at hand. If a distinction is to be made between divination and fortune-telling, divination has a more formal or ritualistic element and often contains a more social character, usually in a religious context, as seen in traditional African medicine. Fortune-telling, on the other hand, is a more everyday practice for personal purposes. Particular divination methods vary by culture and religion.
Divination is dismissed by the scientific community and skeptics as being superstition. In the 2nd century, Lucian devoted a witty essay to the career of a charlatan, “Alexander the false prophet,” trained by “one of those who advertise enchantments, miraculous incantations, charms for your love-affairs, visitations for your enemies, disclosures of buried treasure, and successions to estates”,[4] even though most Romans believed in prophetic dreams and charms.

Endor Witch:

The Witch of Endor, Hebrew, אוב מעין הדור, sometimes called the Medium of Endor, was a medium who apparently summoned the prophet Samuel’s spirit, at the demand of King Saul of the Kingdom of Israel in the First Book of Samuel, chapter 28:3–25. The witch is absent from the version of that event recounted in the deuterocanonical Book of Sirach (46:19–20).

After Samuel had died, he was buried in Ramah. After Samuel’s death, Saul received no answer from God from dreams, prophets, or the Urim and Thummim as to his best course of action against the assembled forces of the Philistines. Consequently Saul, who has earlier driven out all necromancers and magicians from Israel, seeks out a medium, anonymously and in disguise. Following the instruction of her visitor, the woman claims that she sees the ghost of Samuel rising from the abode of the dead.1 The voice of the prophet’s ghost, after complaining of being disturbed, berates Saul for disobeying God, and predicts Saul’s downfall, with his whole army, in battle the next day, then adds that Saul and his sons will join him, then, in the abode of the dead. Saul is shocked and afraid, and following the encounter his army is defeated and Saul commits suicide after being wounded.
The woman is described as “a woman with an ob” (אוֹב, a talisman[2] or perhaps wineskin)[3] in Hebrew, which may be a reference to ventriloquism,[4] and claims to see “elohim arising” (plural verb) from the ground.

The Egg of Life:

The “Egg of Life” symbol is composed of seven circles taken from the design of the Flower of Life.1 The shape of the Egg of Life is said to be the shape of a multi-cellular embryo in its first hours of creation.[17]
Derived from the Egg of Life is the basis for the following geometrical figures:
Cube – One of the platonic solids
Tetrahedron – One of the platonic solids
Star tetrahedron – Much like the Jewish Star of David.

The Emerald Tablet:

The Emerald Tablet, also known as the Smaragdine Table, or Tabula Smaragdina, is a compact and cryptic piece of Hermetica reputed to contain the secret of the prima materia and its transmutation. It was highly regarded by European alchemists as the foundation of their art and its Hermetic tradition. Although Hermes Trismegistus is the author named in the text, the first known appearance of the Emerald Tablet is in a book written in Arabic between the sixth and eighth centuries. The text was first translated into Latin in the twelfth century. Numerous translations, interpretations and commentaries followed.
The layers of meaning in the Emerald Tablet have been associated with the creation of the philosopher’s stone, laboratory experimentation, phase transition, the alchemical magnum opus, the ancient, classical, element system, and the correspondence between macrocosm and microcosm.

The Emerald Tablets of Thoth:

DR. DOREAL’S TRANSLATION
Dr. Doreal, who has a connection with the Great White Lodge, which also works through the Pyramid Priest-hood, was instructed to recover and return to the Great Pyramid, these Ancient Tablets.

This was accomplished, but before returning them, Doreal was given permission to translate and retain a copy of the wisdom engraved on the Tablets.

This was done in 1925, and now, permission has been given for this translation by Doreal to be published solely through the Brotherhood of the White Temple. This is the only authorized, original and true rendition of these Emerald Tablets.

It is expected that many will scoff, yet the true student will read between the lines and gain wisdom. If the light is in you, the light which is engraved in the Tablets will respond.

THOTH, THE ATLANTEAN
When Thoth, the Atlantean and Master raised the people of Khem (Egypt) to a great civilization, and when the time came for him to leave Egypt, he erected The Great Pyramid over the entrance of the Great Halls of Amenti. In the Pyramid, he posited his records and appointed Guards for his secrets from among the highest of his people.

In later times, the descendants of these guards became the Pyramid Priests, while Thoth was deified as the God of Wisdom, the Recorder, by those in the age of darkness which followed his passing. In legend, the Halls of Amenti became the underworld, the Halls of the Gods, where the soul passed after death for judgment.

During later ages, the ego of Thoth passed into the bodies of men in the manner described in The Emerald Tablets, a Book of Record and Occult Wisdom which he wrote and left in the Pyramid for those of a future Age of Light.

THE TABLETS
His writings consist of twelve Tablets of Emerald Green formed from a substance created through alchemical transmutation.

They are imperishable, resistant to all elements, corrosion and acids. In effect, the atomic and cellular structure is fixed, and no change can take place, thus violating the material law of ionization.

Upon them are engraved characters in the Ancient Atlantean language; characters which respond to the attuned thought waves of the reader and which release much more wisdom and information than the characters do when merely deciphered. The Tablets are fastened together with hoops of a golden colored alloy suspended from a rod of the same material.

Dr. Doreal has translated this Work, and has published through the Brotherhood of the White Temple, a translation of ten of these twelve Tablets. He has divided the ten into thirteen parts for the sake of convenience. The last two Tablets are found in the “Interpretation of The Emerald Tablets”, also by Dr. Doreal.

In The Emerald Tablets are found secrets which will prove of inestimable value to the serious student. The following is an excerpt taken from this work:
“A Long time ago I, in my childhood, lay neath the stars on long buried Atlantis, dreaming of mysteries far above men. Then in my heart, grew there a great longing to conquer the pathway that led to the Stars.

Year after year I sought after wisdom, seeking new knowledge, following the way, until at last my soul, in great travail, broke from its bondage of earth-man. Free from the body, I flashed through the night. Unlocked at last for me was the star-space; free was I from the bondage of night.

Now to the end of space sought I wisdom, far beyond knowledge of finite man”.

Translation & Interpretation by Doreal
Originally published in mimeographed form in the 1930s by a mysterious “Dr. Doreal,” these writings quickly became an underground sensation among esotoricists of the time.

Tablets 1-13 are part of the original work; tablets 14 and 15 are supplemental.

No one has ever seen the original tablets mentioned here, and in all likelihood, these writings would be considered channeled material today.

However, the Emerald Tablets of Thoth the Atlantean are still part of the modern Corpus Hermeticum, for they elaborate and deepen the meaning of the historical Emerald Tablet and writings of Thoth/Hermes.

The Emperor (Tarot Card):

The Emperor (IV) is the fourth trump or Major Arcana card in traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The Emperor symbolizes the desire to rule over one’s surroundings, and its appearance in a reading often suggests that the subject needs to accept that some things may not be controllable, and others may not benefit from being controlled.
As with all Tarot cards, multiple meanings are possible. Where the Empress is the Feminine principle, the Emperor is the Masculine. Most individuals will relate to this card in the same way they relate to their own father.

Some frequent keywords used by card readers are:
Fathering —– Stability —– Authority —– Power
Control —– Discipline —– Command —– Common sense
Status quo —– Order —– Structure —– Egocentrism
Tradition —– Rigidity —– Leadership —– Experience
Inflexibility —– Conservative ways —– Organization
The Emperor sits on his throne, holding a scepter, accompanied by the heraldic Eagle of the Holy Roman Empire. This is usually on his shield though the heraldic eagle is sometimes a free-standing statue or live bird. He symbolizes the top of the secular hierarchy, the ultimate male ego. The Emperor is the absolute ruler of the world.

The Empress (Tarot Card):

The Empress (III) is the third trump or Major Arcana card in traditional Tarot decks. It is used in Tarot card games as well as divination.

According to Waite’s The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, The Empress is the inferior (as opposed to nature’s superior) Garden of Eden, the “Earthly Paradise”. Waite defines her as not being Regina Coeli (the Blessed Virgin Mary), but rather a Refugium Peccatorum – a fruitful mother of thousands: she is above all things universal fecundity and the outer sense of the Word, the repository of all things nurturing and sustaining, and of feeding others. The Empress is mother, a creator and nurturer. In many decks she can be shown as pregnant. She can represent the creation of life, of romance, of art or business. The Empress can represent the germination of an idea before it is ready to be fully born. The Empress is often associated with Venus, goddess of beautiful things as well as love, and indeed the Rider-Waite deck brandishes her symbol upon a heart-shaped bolster. The Empress is also often interpreted to be Demeter, goddess of abundance. She is the giver of earthly gifts, although at the same time, she can be overprotective and possessive.[citation needed] In anger she can withhold, as Demeter did when her daughter, Persephone, was kidnapped: Due to her fury and grief, Demeter keeps the Earth cold and barren until Spring when her child is returned.

Some recurring keywords are: Mothering —– Fertility —– Sexuality —– Abundance Material prosperity —– Pleasure —– Comfort —– Power Nature —– Delight —– Desire —– Physical attraction Health —– Sensuality —– Beauty —– Satisfaction The Empress sits on a throne wearing a starry crown, holding a scepter in one hand. The Scepter is representative of her power over life, her crown has twelve stars representing her dominance over the year, and her throne is in the midst of a field of grain, representative of her dominion over growing things.

Entheogen:

An entheogen (“generating the divine within”)5 is a psychoactive substance used in a religious, shamanic, or spiritual context.6 Entheogens can supplement many diverse practices for transcendence, and revelation, including meditation, psychonautics, psychedelic and visionary art, psychedelic therapy, and magic.

Entheogeneration™:

Those who have entered the void and stepped through the fire to receive the divine wisdom of the universe.

Esoteric:

  1. Understood by or meant for only the select few who have special knowledge or interest; recondite: poetry full of esoteric allusions.
  2. Belonging to the select few.
  3. Private; secret; confidential.
  4. (of a philosophical doctrine or the like) Intended to be revealed only to the initiates of a group: the esoteric doctrines of Pythagoras.

Ethos:

The characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations.

Evil Eye:

The evil eye is a malevolent look that many cultures believe able to cause injury or misfortune for the person at whom it is directed for reasons of envy or dislike. Talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called “evil eyes.”23 The term also refers to the power attributed to certain persons of inflicting injury or bad luck by such an envious or ill-wishing look. The evil eye is usually given to others who remain unaware.4 The “evil eye” is also known in Arabic as ʿayn al-ḥasūd (عين الحسود‎), in Hebrew as ʿáyin hā-ráʿ (עַיִן הָרַע‎), in Kurdish çaw e zar (eye of evil/sickness), in Persian as chashm zakhm (چشم زخم eye-caused injury) or chashm e bad (bad eye), in Turkish as Nazar (nazar is from Arabic نَظَر Nadhar which means eye vision or eyesight), similarly in Urdu/Hindi/Punjabi the word Nazar or Boori Nazar (bad eye/look) is used, in Amharic buda, in Afghan Pashto cheshim mora, and also “Nazar”, in Greek as to máti (το μάτι), in Spanish as mal de ojo,5 in Italian as malocchio, in Portuguese mau-olhado (“act of giving an evil/sick look”), in Swedish as “ge onda ögat”(to give an evil look), and in Hawaiian it is known as “stink eye”6 or maka pilau meaning “rotten eyes”.7 The idea expressed by the term causes many cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, primarily the Middle East. The idea appears several times in translations of the Old Testament.8 It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations featuring the eye are a common sight across Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists.

Evocation:

Evocation is the act of calling or summoning a spirit, demon, god or other supernatural agent, in the Western mystery tradition. Comparable practices exist in many religions and magical traditions and may employ the use of pharmakeia with and without uttered word formulas.

Evolve:

To change or develop slowly often into a better, more complex, or more advanced state : to develop by a process of evolution

Exorcism:

Exorcism (from Greek ἐξορκισμός, exorkismos – binding by oath) is the practice of evicting demons or other spiritual entities from a person or an area they are believed to have possessed.2 Depending on the spiritual beliefs of the exorcist, this may be done by causing the entity to swear an oath, performing an elaborate ritual, or simply by commanding it to depart in the name of a higher power. The practice is ancient and part of the belief system of many cultures and religions. Requested and performed exorcisms had begun to decline in the Western world by the 18th century and occurred rarely until the latter half of the 20th century when the public saw a sharp rise due to the media attention exorcisms were getting. There was “a 50% increase in the number of exorcisms performed between the early 1960s and the mid-1970s”.

Familiars (nee: Familiar Spirit):

In European folklore and folk-belief of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, familiar spirits (sometimes referred to simply as “familiars” or “animal guides”) were supernatural entities believed to assist witches and cunning folk in their practice of magic.2 According to the records of the time, they would appear in numerous guises, often as an animal, but also at times as a human or humanoid figure, and were described as “clearly defined, three-dimensional… forms, vivid with colour and animated with movement and sound” by those alleging to have come into contact with them, unlike later descriptions of ghosts with their “smoky, undefined form[s]”.3 When they served witches, they were often thought to be malevolent, while when working for cunning-folk they were often thought of as benevolent (although there was some ambiguity in both cases). The former were often categorised as demons, while the latter were more commonly thought of and described as fairies. The main purpose of familiars is to serve the witch or young witch, providing protection for him/her as they come into their new powers.4 Since the 20th century a number of magical practitioners, including adherents of the Neopagan religion of Wicca, have begun to utilise the concept of familiars, due to their association with older forms of magic.

The Flower of Life:

The Flower of Life is a name for a geometrical figure composed of multiple evenly-spaced, overlapping circles. This figure, used as a decorative motif since ancient times, forms a flower-like pattern with the symmetrical structure of a hexagon. A “Flower of Life” figure consists of seven or more overlapping circles, in which the center of each circle is on the circumference of up to six surrounding circles of the same diameter. However, the surrounding circles need not be clearly or completely drawn; in fact, some ancient symbols that are claimed as examples of the Flower of Life contain only a single circle or hexagon. Drunvalo Melchizedek, an author from the New Age movement, has called these figures symbols of sacred geometry, asserting that they represent ancient spiritual beliefs, and that they depict fundamental aspects of space and time.23 Melchizedek claims that Metatron’s Cube may be derived from the Flower of Life pattern, and that the Platonic solids within it were “thought to act as a template from which all life springs.”4 The Flower of Life and the Seed of Life are linked by New Age authors with the Biblical prophet Enoch, the Archangel Metatron, the six days of Creation, the Vesica Piscis religious symbol, and Borromean rings.23

The Fool (Tarot Card):

The Fool or The Jester is one of the 78 cards in a Tarot deck; one of the 22 Trump cards that make up the Major Arcana. The Fool is unnumbered; sometime represented as 0 (the first) or XXI (the second to last) or XXII (the last) Major Arcana in decks. It is used in divination as well as in game playing.

The Fool is the spirit in search of experience. He represents the mystical cleverness bereft of reason within us, the childlike ability to tune into the inner workings of the world. The sun shining behind him represents the divine nature of the Fool’s wisdom and exuberance, holy madness or ‘crazy wisdom’. On his back are all the possessions he might need. In his hand there is a flower, showing his appreciation of beauty. He is frequently accompanied by a dog, sometimes seen as his animal desires, sometimes as the call of the “real world”, nipping at his heels and distracting him. He is seemingly oblivious that he is walking toward a precipice, apparently about to step off. One of the keys to the card is the paradigm of the precipice, Zero and the sometimes represented oblivious Fool’s near-step into the oblivion (The Void) of the jaws of a crocodile, for example, are all mutually informing polysemy within evocations of the iconography of The Fool. The staff is the offset and complement to the void and this in many traditions represents wisdom and renunciation, e.g. ‘danda’ (Sanskrit) of a Sanyassin, ‘danda’ (Sanskrit) is also a punctuation mark with the function analogous to a ‘full-stop’ which is appropriately termed a period in American English. The Fool is both the beginning and the end, neither and otherwise, betwixt and between, liminal.
The number 0 is a perfect significator for the Fool, as it can become anything when he reaches his destination as in the sense of ‘joker’s wild’. Zero plus anything equals the same thing. Zero times anything equals zero.[5] Zero is nothing, a lack of hard substance, and as such it may reflect a non-issue or lack of cohesiveness for the subject at hand.

Fractal:

A fractal is a mathematical set described by Fractal Geometry, the study of figures exhibiting fractal dimension. A fractal set when plotted typically displays self-similar patterns, which means they are “the same from near as from far”.1 Fractals may be exactly the same at every scale, or, as illustrated in Figure 1, they may be nearly the same at different scales.[2][2][4][3] The concept of fractal extends beyond trivial self-similarity and includes the idea of a detailed pattern repeating itself

Freemasonry:

Freemasonry is a fraternal organisation that traces its origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons, which from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of masons and their interaction with authorities and clients. The degrees of freemasonry, its gradal system, retain the three grades of medieval craft guilds, those of Apprentice, journeyman or fellow (now called Fellowcraft), and Master Mason. These are the degrees offered by craft, or blue lodge Freemasonry. There are additional degrees, which vary with locality and jurisdiction, and are now administered by different bodies than the craft degrees.
The basic, local organisational unit of Freemasonry is the lodge. The lodges are usually supervised and governed at the regional level (usually coterminous with either a state, province, or national border) by a Grand Lodge or Grand Orient. There is no international, world-wide Grand Lodge that supervises all of Freemasonry. Each Grand Lodge is independent, and they do not necessarily recognise each other as being legitimate.

The Fruit of Life:

Fruit-of-Life Stages 61-circles-to-13-circles.svg
The “Fruit of Life” symbol is composed of 13 circles.1 The fruit of Life is said to be the blueprint of the universe, containing the basis for the design of every atom, molecular structure, life form, and everything in existence.1[2] It contains the geometric basis for the delineation of Metatron’s Cube, which brings forth the platonic solids. If each circle’s centre is considered a “node”, and each node is connected to each other node with a single line, a total of seventy-eight lines are created, forming a type of cube (Metatron’s Cube). The image below does not show the dodecahedron and the icosahedron fitting the pattern of Metatron’s Cube because it is a two dimensional image, If the circles are replaced with spheres and the image is completed, both the dodecahedron and the icosahedron will fit the image.[25]

Gemini:

May 21 – June 21

Gemini is the third sign of the zodiac, and those born under this sign will be quick to tell you all about it. That’s because they love to talk! It’s not just idle chatter with these folks, either. The driving force behind a Gemini’s conversation is their mind. The Gemini-born are intellectually inclined, forever probing people and places in search of information. The more information a Gemini collects, the better. Sharing that information later on with those they love is also a lot of fun, for Geminis are supremely interested in developing their relationships. Dalliances with these folks are always enjoyable, since Geminis are bright, quick-witted and the proverbial life of the party. Even though their intellectual minds can rationalize forever and a day, Geminis also have a surplus of imagination waiting to be tapped. Can a Gemini be boring? Never!

Genetically Modified Organism (GMO):

A genetically modified organism (GMO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. Organisms that have been genetically modified include micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeast, insects, plants, fish, and mammals. GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods, and are also widely used in scientific research and to produce goods other than food. The term GMO is very close to the technical legal term, ‘living modified organism’ defined in the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, which regulates international trade in living GMOs (specifically, “any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology”).
This article focuses on what organisms have been genetically engineered, and for what purposes. The article on genetic engineering focuses on the history and methods of genetic engineering, and on applications of genetic engineering and of GMOs. Both articles cover much of the same ground but with different organizations (sorted by organism in this article; sorted by application in the other). There are separate articles on genetically modified crops, genetically modified food, regulation of the release of genetic modified organisms, and controversies.

The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP):

An ionospheric research program jointly funded by the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Navy, the University of Alaska, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).1 Designed and built by BAE Advanced Technologies (BAEAT), its purpose is to analyze the ionosphere and investigate the potential for developing ionospheric enhancement technology for radio communications and surveillance.[2] The HAARP program operates a major sub-arctic facility, named the HAARP Research Station, on an Air Force–owned site near Gakona, Alaska.
The most prominent instrument at the HAARP Station is the Ionospheric Research Instrument (IRI), a high-power radio frequency transmitter facility operating in the high frequency (HF) band. The IRI is used to temporarily excite a limited area of the Ionosphere. Other instruments, such as a VHF and a UHF radar, a fluxgate magnetometer, a digisonde (an ionospheric sounding device), and an induction magnetometer, are used to study the physical processes that occur in the excited region.
Work on the HAARP Station began in 1993. The current working IRI was completed in 2007, and its prime contractor was BAE Systems Advanced Technologies.1 As of 2008, HAARP had incurred around $250 million in tax-funded construction and operating costs. It was reported to be temporarily shut down in May 2013, awaiting a change of contractors.
HAARP is a target of conspiracy theorists, who claim that it is capable of modifying weather, disabling satellites and exerting mind control over people, and that it is being used as a weapon against terrorists[citation needed]. Such theorists have blamed the program for causing earthquakes, droughts, storms and floods, diseases such as Gulf War Syndrome and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, the 1996 crash of TWA Flight 800, and the 2003 destruction of the space shuttle Columbia. Commentators and scientists say that proponents of these theories are “uninformed”, as most theories put forward fall well outside the abilities of the facility and often outside the scope of natural science.[3][4

The Hanged Man (Tarot Card):

The Hanged Man (XII) is the twelfth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The Hanged Man’s symbolism points to divinity, linking it to the Passion in Christianity, especially The Crucifixion; to the narratives of Osiris in Egyptian mythology, and Mithras in Ancient Persian mythology and Roman mythology. In all of these archetypal stories, the destruction of self brings life to humanity; on the card, these are symbolized respectively by the person of the hanged man and the living tree from which he hangs bound.
The Hanged Man is also associated with Odin, the primary god in Norse mythology. Odin hung upside down from the world-tree, Yggdrasil, for nine days to attain wisdom and thereby retrieved the runes from the Well of Wyrd, which in Norse cosmology is regarded as the source and end of all sacred mystery and knowledge. The moment he glimpsed the runes, he died, but the knowledge of them was so powerful that he immediately returned to life.

Waite suggests the card carries the following meanings or keywords:
Sacrifice —– Letting go —– Surrendering —– Passivity
Suspension —– Acceptance —– Renunciation —– Patience
New point of view —– Contemplation —– Inner harmony
Conformism —– Non-action —– Waiting —– Giving up

Heresy:

Heresy is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs.1 Heresy is distinct from both apostasy, which is the explicit renunciation of one’s religion, principles or cause,[2] and blasphemy, which is irreverence toward religion.[3]
The term is usually used to refer to violations of religious or traditional laws or legal codes, although it is used by some political extremists to refer to their opponents. It carries the connotation of behaviors or beliefs likely to undermine accepted morality and cause tangible evils, damnation, or other punishment.
In certain historical Islamic, Christian, Jewish, Marxist and many other cultures, espousing ideas deemed heretical has been and in some cases still is subjected not merely to punishments such as excommunication, but even to the death penalty.

The Hermetica:

The Hermetica are Egyptian-Greek wisdom texts from the 2nd and 3rd centuries CE,1 which are mostly presented as dialogues in which a teacher, generally identified as Hermes Trismegistus (“thrice-greatest Hermes”), enlightens a disciple. The texts form the basis of Hermeticism. They discuss the divine, the cosmos, mind, and nature. Some touch upon alchemy, astrology, and related concepts.

Hermeticism:

Hermeticism, also called Hermetism,1[2] is a religious and philosophical tradition based primarily upon pseudepigraphical writings attributed to Hermes Trismegistus (“Thrice Great”).[3] These writings have greatly influenced the Western esoteric tradition and were considered to be of great importance during both the Renaissance[4] and the Reformation.[5] The tradition claims descent from a prisca theologia, a doctrine which affirms that a single, true theology exists which is present in all religions and was given by God to man in antiquity.[6][7]
Many Christian writers, including Lactantius, Thomas of Aquinas, Augustine, Giordano Bruno, Marsilio Ficino, Campanella and Giovanni Pico della Mirandola considered Hermes Trismegistus to be a wise pagan prophet who foresaw the coming of Christianity.[8][9]
An account of how Hermes Trismegistus received the name “Thrice Great” is derived from the The Emerald Tablet of Hermes Trismegistus, wherein it is stated that he knew the three parts of the wisdom of the whole universe.[10] The three parts of the wisdom are alchemy, astrology, and theurgy.
The Poimandres, from which Marsilio Ficino formed his opinion, states that “They called him Trismegistus because he was the greatest philosopher and the greatest priest and the greatest king.”[11] The Suda (10th century) states that “He was called Trismegistus on account of his praise of the trinity, saying there is one divine nature in the trinity.”[12]
Much of the importance of Hermeticism arises from its connection with the development of science during the time from 1300 to 1600 A.D.[citation needed] The prominence that it gave to the idea of influencing or controlling nature led many scientists to look to magic and its allied arts (e.g., alchemy, astrology)[citation needed] which, it was thought, could put Nature to the test by means of experiments.[citation needed] Consequently it was the practical aspects of Hermetic writings that attracted the attention of scientists.[citation needed]
Isaac Newton placed great faith in the concept of an unadulterated, pure, ancient doctrine, which he studied vigorously to aid his understanding of the physical world. Many of Newton’s manuscripts—most of which are still unpublished—detail his thorough study of the Corpus Hermeticum, writings said to have been transmitted from ancient times, in which the secrets and techniques of influencing the stars and the forces of nature were revealed.

The Hermit (Tarot Card):

The Hermit (IX) is the ninth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The Hermit has internalized the lessons of life to the point that he is the lesson. The Hermit, as a kind of shamanistic hero, has made the complete journey – both the withdrawal and the return. As Joseph Campbell said, “A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.” (The Hero with a Thousand Faces)
There are two possible ways this card can be interpreted:
First, the need to withdraw from society to become comfortable with himself.
Second, the return from isolation to share his knowledge with others.

Some frequent keywords are:
Introspection —– Silence —– Guidance —– Reflection
Solitude —– Looking inward —– Reclusion —– Being quiet
Inner search —– Deep understanding —– Isolation
Distance —– Retreat —– Philosophical attitude

The Hierophant (Tarot Card):

The Hierophant (V), in some decks named The Pope, is the fifth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The card stands for religion and orthodox theology. It also represents traditional education or a “Man of high social standing”. These interpretations merely scratch the surface of the card. The Pope card also represents the Biblical story of God’s creation of man and woman. He is also strongly associated with the Deceiver and with Power over others.
Some interpretations also suggest a link between the card and the myth of Isis and Osiris, a claim made about many cards.[citation needed] Some say the card corresponds to the astrological sign of Taurus, others Leo.[2] Yet another association is with the sign Cancer.[citation needed] In non-Western cultures (Native American, Siberian) the Hierophant retains the role as spiritual guide, wearing here the mask of a shaman who is also the teacher of holy things.[citation needed] In Native America, the mythological association is with the Coyote or Trickster God, one who is a teacher, a benefactor for the spiritual student, but who is often playful or mischievous.
The Hierophant is the card representing organized religion — any organized religion.[citation needed] Its positive and negative aspects are those associated with that religion.
“Hierophant” literally means “the one who teaches the holy things”. Ideally, the Hierophant prepares the Querant spiritually for the adventure of life. The card also represents individuation or the point where a child starts to understand the boundaries between Self and Other, family and the community.[citation needed] This is the point where the individual starts constructing his or her own identity, consciously, unconsciously, or as shaped by exterior forces.
The Hierophant is usually Key 5 of the Major Arcana. Five represents the essence of things as they are, as in the word “quintessence” from the Latin words for five and for nature.[citation needed] It is also the number of the senses: sight, hearing, taste, feeling, and smell. The Hierophant sits on a throne straddling the world of the senses and the world of meaning.
It is related through cross sums (the sum of the digits) with Key 14: Temperance. The Hierophant presents the lessons of heaven to earth. Temperance guides the soul from this world to the underworld.
Some authorities[who?] say that the Hierophant generally represents assistance, friendship, good advice, alliances (including marriages), and religious interests. Reversed; it often refers to bad advice, lies, and persecution.
Others say that it represents the first level of understanding. When it appears in a tarot spread, it is a warning to the Querant to reexamine his or her understanding of the meaning of things; of the structure of the world; of the powers that be. Watch out for hypocrisy.
The negative aspect of The Hierophant is well illustrated by the myth of Procrustes. Procrustes was a man (or a monster) living in the mountains of Greece. He invited weary travelers into his home, washed the dust off their feet, provided a meal, and let them lie on his bed. If they were too big for his bed, he cut them to size. If they were too small, he stretched them to fit. At last, Theseus came through the mountains and accepted Procrustes’s seemingly kind offer. When Procrustes tried to cut him to fit, Theseus killed him, making the road safe.[citation needed] In this way, the Hierophant is like Freud’s superego. It shapes us, sometimes brutally. This shaping is necessary for us to become who we are. Sometimes, it’s merely the replication of historic cruelties. Freud theorized at one point that the superego is an internalization of one’s parents.[citation needed] The Hierophant may represent the parents, living in the Querant.

Some frequent keywords associated with The Hierophant are:
Education —– Knowledge —– Status quo —– Institution
Conservatism —– Discipline —– Maturity —– Formality
Deception —– Power —– Respect —– Duality
Social convention —– Belief system —– Group identification
Experience —– Tradition —– Naïve

The High Priestess (Tarot Card):

The High Priestess (II) is the second trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. This card is used in game playing as well as in divination. In the first Tarot pack with inscriptions, the 18th-century woodcut Marseilles Tarot, this figure is crowned with the Papal tiara and labelled La Papesse, the Popess, a possible reference to the legend of Pope Joan.

Knowingness – Love – Relationships
Wisdom – Sound judgment – Serenity
Common sense – Intuition
Mystical vision – introspection – otherworldliness
Commonly this card is associated with the card reader or the querant, because it is also focused on ‘secrets’ it also interpreted when a secret is kept or revealed, when you are holding on to the truth or revealing it, the card associated with mystery, when powerful feminine influences and support currently in force for the querant. It can also represent the perfect woman in a man’s life, and to a woman it can represent being independently solo perhaps without a man.

Hollow Earth Theory:

The Hollow Earth hypothesis proposes that the planet Earth is either entirely hollow or otherwise contains a substantial interior space. The scientific community has dismissed the notion since at least the late 18th century. The concept of a hollow Earth recurs many times in folklore and as the premise for subterranean fiction, a subgenre of adventure fiction. It is also featured in some present-day pseudoscientific and conspiracy theories.

Holographic Universe:

The holographic principle is a property of quantum gravity and string theories that states that the description of a volume of space can be thought of as encoded on a boundary to the region—preferably a light-like boundary like a gravitational horizon. First proposed by Gerard ‘t Hooft, it was given a precise string-theory interpretation by Leonard Susskind1 who combined his ideas with previous ones of ‘t Hooft and Charles Thorn.1[2] As pointed out by Raphael Bousso,[3] Thorn observed in 1978 that string theory admits a lower-dimensional description in which gravity emerges from it in what would now be called a holographic way.

Holy Grail:

The Holy Grail is a dish, plate, stone, or cup that is part of an important theme of Arthurian literature. A grail, wondrous but not explicitly “holy,” first appears in Perceval le Gallois, an unfinished romance by Chrétien de Troyes:1 it is a processional salver used to serve at a feast. Chrétien’s story attracted many continuators, translators and interpreters in the later 12th and early 13th centuries, including Wolfram von Eschenbach, who makes the grail a great precious stone that fell from the sky. The Grail legend became interwoven with legends of the Holy Chalice.[2] The connection with Joseph of Arimathea and with vessels associated with the Last Supper and crucifixion of Jesus, dates from Robert de Boron’s Joseph d’Arimathie (late 12th century) in which Joseph receives the Grail from an apparition of Jesus and sends it with his followers to Great Britain. Building upon this theme, later writers recounted how Joseph used the Grail to catch Christ’s blood while interring him and how he founded a line of guardians to keep it safe in Britain. The legend may combine Christian lore with a Celtic myth of a cauldron endowed with special powers.

I-Ching:

The I Ching, also known as the Classic of Changes, Book of Changes, Zhouyi and Yijing, is one of the oldest of the Chinese classic texts.1 The book contains a divination system comparable to Western geomancy or the West African Ifá system; in Western cultures and modern East Asia, it is still widely used for this purpose.
Traditionally, the I Ching and its hexagrams were thought to pre-date recorded history,[2] and based on traditional Chinese accounts, its origins trace back to the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE.[3] Modern scholarship suggests that the earliest layers of the text may date from the end of the 2nd millennium BCE, but place doubts on the mythological aspects in the traditional accounts.[4] Some consider the I Ching the oldest extant book of divination, dating from 1,000 BCE and before.[5] The oldest manuscript that has been found, albeit incomplete, dates back to the Warring States period (475–221 BCE).[6]
During the Warring States Period, the text was re-interpreted as a system of cosmology and philosophy that subsequently became intrinsic to Chinese culture. It centered on the ideas of the dynamic balance of opposites, the evolution of events as a process, and acceptance of the inevitability of change.
The standard text originated from the Old Text version (古文經) transmitted by Fei Zhi (费直, c. 50 BCE-10 CE) of the Han Dynasty, which survived Qin’s book-burning. During the Han Dynasty this version competed with the bowdlerised new text (今文經) version transmitted by Tian He at the beginning of the Western Han. However, by the time of the Tang Dynasty the Old Text version became accepted as standard.

Iboga:

Tabernanthe iboga or simply iboga is a perennial rainforest shrub and psychedelic, native to western Central Africa. Iboga stimulates the central nervous system when taken in small doses and induces visions in larger doses. In parts of Africa where the plant grows the bark of the root is chewed for various pharmacological or ritualistic purposes. Ibogaine, the active alkaloid, is also used to treat substance abuse disorders. A small amount of ibogaine, along with precursors of ibogaine are found in Voacanga africana.

Illuminati:

The Illuminati (plural of Latin illuminatus, “enlightened”) is a name given to several groups, both real and fictitious. Historically the name refers to the Bavarian Illuminati, an Enlightenment-era secret society founded on May 1, 1776 to oppose superstition, prejudice, religious influence over public life, abuses of state power, and to support women’s education and gender equality. The Illuminati—along with other secret societies—were outlawed by the Bavarian ruler, Charles Theodore, with the encouragement of the Roman Catholic Church, and permanently disbanded in 1785.1 In the several years following, the group was vilified by conservative and religious critics who claimed they had regrouped and were responsible for the French Revolution.
In subsequent use, “Illuminati” refers to various organizations claiming or purported to have unsubstantiated links to the original Bavarian Illuminati or similar secret societies, and often alleged to conspire to control world affairs by masterminding events and planting agents in government and corporations to establish a New World Order and gain further political power and influence. Central to some of the most widely known and elaborate conspiracy theories, the Illuminati have been depicted as lurking in the shadows and pulling the strings and levers of power in dozens of novels, movies, television shows, comics, video games and music videos.

Incubus:

An incubus (nominal form constructed from the Latin verb, incubo, incubare, or “to lie upon”) is a demon in male form who, according to a number of mythological and legendary traditions, lies upon sleepers, especially women, in order to have sexual intercourse with them. Its female counterpart is the succubus. An incubus may pursue sexual relations with a woman in order to father a child, as in the legend of Merlin.1 Religious tradition holds that repeated intercourse with an incubus or succubus may result in the deterioration of health, or even death.[2]

Indigo Children:

Indigo children, according to a pseudoscientific New Age concept, are children who are believed to possess special, unusual and sometimes supernatural traits or abilities.[4] The idea is based on concepts developed in the 1970s by Nancy Ann Tappe[5] and further developed by Jan Tober and Lee Carroll. The concept of indigo children gained popular interest with the publication of a series of books in the late 1990s and the release of several films in the following decade. A variety of books, conferences and related materials have been created surrounding belief in the idea of indigo children and their nature and abilities. The interpretations of these beliefs range from their being the next stage in human evolution, in some cases possessing paranormal abilities such as telepathy, to the belief that they are more empathetic and creative than their peers.

Jinn (nee: djinn, genies):

The jinn (also djinn or genies, Arabic: الجن‎ al-jinn, singular الجني al-jinnī) are spiritual creatures in Islam and Arabic folklore. They are mentioned in the Qur’an and other Islamic texts and inhabit an unseen world in dimensions beyond the visible universe of humans. Together, the jinn, humans and angels make up the three sapient creations of God. The Qur’an mentions that the jinn are made of a smokeless and “scorching fire”,1 but also physical in nature, being able to interact physically with people and objects and likewise be acted upon.[clarification needed][2] Like human beings, the jinn can also be good, evil, or neutrally benevolent and hence have freewill like humans and unlike angels.[3] The jinn are mentioned frequently in the Qurʾan, and the 72nd sura is titled Sūrat al-Jinn.

Judgement (Tarot Card):

Judgement (XX), or in some decks spelled Judgment, is a Tarot card, part of the Major Arcana suit usually comprising 22 cards.1

Some frequent keywords are:
Judgement —– Rebirth —– Inner Calling —– Absolution
Restart —– Accepting past mistakes/actions —– Release
Forgiveness —– End of repression —– Reconciliation —– Renewal
Decision —– Salvation —– New beginning —– Hope —– Redemption
When Judgment appears in a reading, it is usually interpreted as a signal of an impending judgment, such as of postponed decisions. As the card symbolizes resurrection, it can also be interpreted to herald the return of individuals from the past. The card also represents the Christian God’s promise of life after death. In a reading, especially near the Six of Cups, it may represent a preoccupation with the past, while also suggesting a new beginning and clearing out of the past[citation needed]. Tarot scholar Tara Miller writes that “Judgment represents the House of Gabriel, the knowing that Judgment Day can come at any moment; live your life to the fullest, as the trumpet of Gabriel is at hand.

Jupiter:

Planet of Luck

Jupiter is the thinking-person’s planet. As the guardian of the abstract mind, this planet rules higher learning, and bestows upon us a yen for exploring ideas, both intellectually and spiritually. Intellectually speaking, Jupiter assists us in formulating our ideology. In the more spiritual realm, Jupiter lords over religions and philosophy. A search for the answers is what Jupiter proposes, and if it means spanning the globe to find them, well, that’s probably why Jupiter also rules long-distance travel. In keeping with this theme, Jupiter compels us to assess our ethical and moral values; it also addresses our sense of optimism.

Justice (Tarot Card):

Justice is a Major Arcana Tarot card, numbered either VIII or XI, depending on the deck. This card is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The Justice card, as a member of the Tarot deck, appears in early Tarot, such as the Tarot de Marseilles. It is part of the Tarot’s major arcana, and usually follows the Chariot, as card VIII, although various decks vary from this pattern. Justice (virtue), accompanies two of the other cardinal virtues in the Major Arcana: temperance and strength.
A. E. Waite was a key figure in the development of the most famous of modern Tarot interpretations.1 His version of the Justice card contains, as his cards usually do, references to classical Mythology. In his deck, the card is 11 (switched with the Strength (Tarot card)).
Some frequent keywords are:
Impartiality —– Distance —– Coldness —– Justice
Objective mind—– Criticism —– Being clever —– Insensitivity
Decision —– Intellect —– Analysis —– Realism —– Severity
Responsibility —– Rationality —– Clear vision —– Logic and reason

Kabbalah:

Kabbalah (Hebrew: קַבָּלָה‎, literally “receiving/tradition”; also transliterated Cabala, Qabbālâ etc.; different transliterations now tend to denote alternative traditions1) is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought that originated in Judaism. A traditional Kabbalist in Judaism is called a Mekubal (Hebrew: מְקוּבָל‎).
Kabbalah’s definition varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it,[2] from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later Christian, New Age, and Occultist syncretic adaptations. Kabbalah is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between an unchanging, eternal, and mysterious Ein Sof (no end) and the mortal and finite universe (God’s creation). While it is heavily used by some denominations, it is not a religious denomination in itself. It forms the foundations of mystical religious interpretation. Kabbalah seeks to define the nature of the universe and the human being, the nature and purpose of existence, and various other ontological questions. It also presents methods to aid understanding of these concepts and thereby attain spiritual realisation.
Kabbalah originally developed entirely within the realm of Jewish thought, and kabbalists often use classical Jewish sources to explain and demonstrate its esoteric teachings. These teachings are held by followers in Judaism to define the inner meaning of both the Hebrew Bible and traditional Rabbinic literature and their formerly concealed transmitted dimension, as well as to explain the significance of Jewish religious observances.[3]
Traditional practitioners believe its earliest origins pre-date world religions, forming the primordial blueprint for Creation’s philosophies, religions, sciences, arts, and political systems.[4] Historically, Kabbalah emerged, after earlier forms of Jewish mysticism, in 12th- to 13th-century Southern France and Spain, becoming reinterpreted in the Jewish mystical renaissance of 16th-century Ottoman Palestine. It was popularised in the form of Hasidic Judaism from the 18th century onwards. 20th-century interest in Kabbalah has inspired cross-denominational Jewish renewal and contributed to wider non-Jewish contemporary spirituality, as well as engaging its flourishing emergence and historical re-emphasis through newly established academic investigation.

Knights Templar:

The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon (Latin: Pauperes commilitones Christi Templique Salomonici), commonly known as the Knights Templar, the Order of the Temple (French: Ordre du Temple or Templiers) or simply as Templars, were among the most wealthy and powerful of the Western Christian military orders[4] and were among the most prominent actors of the Christian finance. The organization existed for nearly two centuries during the Middle Ages.
Officially endorsed by the Catholic Church around 1129, the Order became a favoured charity throughout Christendom and grew rapidly in membership and power. Templar knights, in their distinctive white mantles with a red cross, were among the most skilled fighting units of the Crusades.[5] Non-combatant members of the Order managed a large economic infrastructure throughout Christendom,[6] innovating financial techniques that were an early form of banking,[7][2] and building fortifications across Europe and the Holy Land.
The Templars’ existence was tied closely to the Crusades; when the Holy Land was lost, support for the Order faded. Rumours about the Templars’ secret initiation ceremony created mistrust and King Philip IV of France, deeply in debt to the Order, took advantage of the situation. In 1307, many of the Order’s members in France were arrested, tortured into giving false confessions, and then burned at the stake.[9] Under pressure from King Philip, Pope Clement V disbanded the Order in 1312. The abrupt disappearance of a major part of the European infrastructure gave rise to speculation and legends, which have kept the “Templar” name alive into the modern day.

Kundalini:

Kundalini (Sanskrit kuṇḍalinī, कुण्डलिनी, About this sound pronunciation (help·info)) stems from yogic philosophy as a form of feminine shakti or “corporeal energy”.1 Kundalini is described within Eastern religious, or spiritual, tradition as an indwelling spiritual energy that can be awakened in order to purify the subtle system and ultimately to bestow the state of Yoga, or Divine Union, upon the ‘seeker’ of truth “.[2][2] The Yoga Upanishads describe Kundalini as lying “coiled” at the base of the spine, represented as either a goddess or sleeping serpent waiting to be awakened. In modern commentaries, Kundalini has been called an unconscious, instinctive or libidinal force.[

Lemuria:

Lemuria /lɨˈmjʊəriə/1 is the name of a hypothetical “lost land” variously located in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The concept’s 19th-century origins lie in attempts to account for discontinuities in biogeography; however, the concept of Lemuria has been rendered obsolete by modern theories of plate tectonics. Although sunken continents do exist – like Zealandia in the Pacific as well as Mauritia [2] and the Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian Ocean – there is no known geological formation under the Indian or Pacific Oceans that corresponds to the hypothetical Lemuria.[3]
Though Lemuria is no longer considered a valid scientific hypothesis, it has been adopted by writers involved in the occult, as well as some Tamil writers of India. Accounts of Lemuria differ, but all share a common belief that a continent existed in ancient times and sank beneath the ocean as a result of a geological, often cataclysmic, change, such as pole shift.

Leo:

July 23 – August 22

Leo is the fifth sign of the zodiac. These folks are impossible to miss, since they love being center stage. Making an impression is Job One for Leos, and when you consider their personal magnetism, you see the job is quite easy. Leos are an ambitious lot, and their strength of purpose allows them to accomplish a great deal. The fact that these folks are also creative makes their endeavors fun for them and everyone else. It’s quite common to see a Leo on stage or in Hollywood, since these folks never shy away from the limelight. They are also supremely talented and have a flair for the dramatic. Warmth and enthusiasm seems to seep from every Leo pore, making these folks a pleasure to be around. They do love pleasure!

Libra:

September 23 – October 22

Libra is the seventh sign of the zodiac, and itÕs at this point in the zodiac that we start to see a shift. While the first six signs of the zodiac focus on the individual, the last six focus on the individual’s contact with others and with the world. Libras are first and foremost focused on others and how they relate to them. We can call this the sign of Partnership with a capital ‘P’ because these folks do not want to be alone! For a Libra, everything is better if it’s done as a pair. Libras are good when paired up, too, since they epitomize balance, harmony and a sense of fair play. While they are true team players at work, their favorite partnership is at home: marriage. Libras feel most complete when they are coupled up with their lover, forever.

The Lovers (Tarot Deck):

The Lovers (VI) is the sixth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

In some traditions, the Lovers represent relationships and choices. Its appearance in a spread indicates some decision about an existing relationship, a temptation of the heart, or a choice of potential partners. Often an aspect of the Querent’s life will have to be sacrificed; a bachelor(ette)’s lifestyle may be sacrificed and a relationship gained (or vice versa), or one potential partner may be chosen while another is turned down. Whatever the choice, it should not be made lightly, as the ramifications will be lasting.
The Lovers is associated with the star sign Gemini, and indeed is also known as The Twins in some decks. Other associations are with Air, Mercury, and the Hebrew letter ז (Zayin).
A. E. Waite was a key figure in the development of modern Tarot interpretations. (Wood, 1998) However not all interpretations follow his theology. All Tarot decks may have slightly different meanings, and different interpretations of cards may be presented by different users of the cards.

Some frequent keywords used by tarot readers are:
Love relationship —– Union —– Passion —– Sexuality
Pleasure —– Humanism —– Desire —– Personal beliefs
Individual values —– Physical attraction —– Connection
Affinity —– Bonding —– Romance —– Heart
Following the Marseilles Tradition, also there are:
Choice —– Doubt —– —– Dilemma —– Temptation

Lycanthropy (nee: Werewolf):

A werewolf, also known as a lycanthrope (from the Greek λυκάνθρωπος: λύκος, lykos, “wolf”, and ἄνθρωπος, anthrōpos, “man”), is a mythological or folkloric human with the ability to shapeshift into a wolf or a therianthropic hybrid wolf-like creature, either purposely or after being placed under a curse or affliction (e.g. via a bite or scratch from another werewolf). Early sources for belief in lycanthropy are Petronius and Gervase of Tilbury.
The werewolf is a widespread concept in European folklore, existing in many variants which are related by a common development of a Christian interpretation of underlying Indo-European mythology which developed during the medieval period. From the early modern period, werewolf beliefs also spread to the New World with colonialism. Belief in werewolf develops parallel to the belief in witches, in the course of the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. Like the witchcraft trials as a whole, the trial of supposed werewolves emerges in what is now Switzerland (especially the Valais and Vaud) in the early 15th century and spreads throughout Europe in the 16th, peaking in the 17th and subsiding by the 18th century. The persecution of werewolves and the associated folklore is an integral part of the “witch-hunt” phenomenon, albeit a marginal one, accusations of werewolfery being involved in only a small fraction of witchcraft trials.1 During the early period, accusations of lycanthropy (transformation into a wolf) were mixed with accusations of wolf-riding or wolf-charming. The case of Peter Stumpp (1589) led to a significant peak in both interest in and persecution of supposed werewolves, primarily in French-speaking and German-speaking Europe. The phenomenon persisted longest in Bavaria and Austria, with persecution of wolf-charmers recorded until well after 1650, the final cases taking place in the early 18th century in Carinthia and Styria.[2]
After the end of the witch-trials, the werewolf became of interest in folklore studies and in the emerging Gothic horror genre; werewolf fiction as a genre has pre-modern precedents in medieval romances (e.g. Bisclavret and Guillaume de Palerme) and develops in the 18th century out of the “semi-fictional” chap book tradition. The trappings of horror literature in the 20th century became part of the horror and fantasy genre of modern pop culture.

Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD):

Lysergic acid diethylamide, abbreviated LSD or LSD-25, also known as lysergide (INN) and colloquially as acid, is a semisynthetic psychedelic drug of the ergoline family, well known for its psychological effects which can include altered thinking processes, closed- and open-eye visuals, synesthesia, an altered sense of time and spiritual experiences, as well as for its key role in 1960s counterculture. It is used mainly as an entheogen, recreational drug, and as an agent in psychedelic therapy. LSD is non-addictive, is not known to cause brain damage, and has extremely low toxicity relative to dose.[3] However, adverse psychiatric reactions such as anxiety, paranoia, and delusions are possible.[4]
LSD was first synthesized by Albert Hofmann in 1938 from ergotamine, a chemical derived by Arthur Stoll from ergot, a grain fungus that typically grows on rye. The short form “LSD” comes from its early code name LSD-25, which is an abbreviation for the German “Lysergsäure-diethylamid” followed by a sequential number.[5][6] LSD is sensitive to oxygen, ultraviolet light, and chlorine,[6] especially in solution, though its potency may last for years if it is stored away from light and moisture at low temperature. In pure form it is a colorless, odorless, tasteless solid.[7] LSD is typically delivered orally, usually on a substrate such as absorbent blotter paper, a sugar cube, or gelatin. In its liquid form, it can also be administered by intramuscular or intravenous injection. LSD is very potent, with 20–30 µg (micrograms) being the threshold dose.[8] New clinical LSD experiments in humans started in 2009 for the first time in 35 years.[9]
Introduced by Sandoz Laboratories, with trade-name Delysid, as a drug with various psychiatric uses in 1947, LSD quickly became a therapeutic agent that appeared to show great promise.[10] In the 1950s, officials at the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) thought the drug might be applicable to mind control and chemical warfare; the agency’s MKULTRA research program propagated the drug among young servicemen and students. The subsequent recreational use of the drug by youth culture in the Western world during the 1960s led to a political firestorm that resulted in its prohibition.[11] Currently, a number of organizations—including the Beckley Foundation, MAPS, Heffter Research Institute and the Albert Hofmann Foundation—exist to fund, encourage and coordinate research into the medicinal and spiritual uses of LSD and related psychedelics.[

Machine Elves:

Machine elves (also known as fractal elves, self-transforming machine elves) is a term coined by Terence McKenna to describe the apparent entities (described as “elves”) that have been reported by users of dimethyltryptamine.1 References to such encounters can be found in many cultures ranging from shamanic traditions of native Americans to indigenous Australians and African tribes, as well as among western users of these substances.[2]

Magic:

Magic or sorcery is an attempt to understand, experience and influence the world using rituals, symbols, actions, gestures and language.1[2][3][3] Modern Western magicians generally state magic’s primary purpose to be personal spiritual growth.[5] Modern theories of magic may see it as the result of a universal sympathy where some act can produce a result somewhere else, or as a collaboration with spirits who cause the effect.[6]
The belief in and the practice of magic has been present since the earliest human cultures and continues to have an important religious and medicinal role in many cultures today.[7][4] Magic is often viewed with suspicion by the wider community, and is sometimes practiced in isolation and secrecy.[3]
The concept of magic as a category separate from religion first appeared in Judaism, which derided as magic the practices of pagan worship designed to appease and receive benefits from gods other than Yahweh.[2] Hanegraaff argues that magic is in fact “…a largely polemical concept that has been used by various religious interest groups either to describe their own religious beliefs and practices or – more frequently – to discredit those of others”.[3]

The Magician (Tarot Card):

The Magician, The Magus, or The Juggler (I) is the first trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination. In divination it is considered by some to succeed The Fool card, often numbered 0.

When the Magician appears in a spread, it points to the talents, capabilities and resources at the querent’s disposal. Depending on the card’s placement in relation to other cards, the message is to tap into one’s full potential rather than holding back, especially when there is a need to transform something. There are choices and directions to take. Guidance can arrive through one’s own intuition or in the form of someone who brings about change or transformation.[5]
The card can mean that a manipulator is floating around, usually if it’s reversed. He may be a beneficent guide, but he does not necessarily have our best interests in mind. He may also represent the querent’s ego or self-awareness. He can also represent the intoxication of power, both good and bad.

Some frequent keywords are:
Action — Consciousness — Concentration — Personal power
Practicality — Energy — Creativity — Movement
Precision — Conviction — Manipulation — Self confidence
Being objective — Focusing — Determination — Initiative[2]
In the Magician’s right hand is a wand raised towards heaven, the sky or the element æther, while his left hand is pointing to the earth. This iconographic gesture has multiple meanings, but is endemic to the Mysteries, symbolizing divine immanence, the ability of the magician to bridge the gap between heaven and earth. On the table in front of the Magician the symbols of the four Tarot suits signify the Classical elements of earth, air, fire and water. Beneath are roses and lilies, the flos campi and lilium convallium,[3] changed into garden flowers, to show the culture of aspiration

Majestic 12:

Majestic 12 (or MJ-12) is alleged to have been the code name of a secret committee of scientists, military leaders, and government officials, formed in 1947 by an executive order by U.S. President Harry S. Truman. The purpose of the committee was stated in the Wilbert Smith memo (see below) to have been to investigate the slew of reports of “flying saucer” sightings that were then being received by U.S. military intelligence and in particular to look into the possible physics and technology of propulsion of the aerial objects that were being reported. The formation of the committee is, because of the timing, widely believed to have been precipitated by the recovery of a UFO north of Roswell, New Mexico during July 1947.
Indications of such a group’s existence may have appeared in 1978 in declassified Canadian documents, though neither the term “MJ-12”, nor any of its ascribed variations, was mentioned. Therefore, suggesting this Canadian document is in some way evidence of “MJ-12” is sheer speculation. The first reference to a classified group called “MJ-Twelve” was discovered in a suspicious document dated in 1980. In this first appearance of what is now commonly called “MJ-12”, the name was spelled out, not abbreviated. However, this document was later identified to be a hoax[citation needed] and attributed to United States Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) Special Agent Richard Doty, who provided it to author William Moore for the purpose (according to Moore) of feeding disinformation to Paul Bennewitz, whom AFOSI was actively working to discredit. In 1984, a set of documents was allegedly discovered in United States archives, though under circumstances that are now considered questionable as well. These 1984 documents more closely resemble legitimate declassified documents, appearing to show more effort was made to have them appear genuine. Reportedly, the FBI later declared them to be “completely bogus”.1
UFO conspiracy theories and the popular media based on them sometimes incorporate Majestic 12.

Major Arcana:

The Major Arcana or trumps are a suit of twenty-two cards in the Tarot deck. They serve as a permanent trump and suits in games played with the Tarot deck, and are distinguished from the four standard suits collectively known as the Minor Arcana.1 The terms “Major” and “Minor Arcana” are used in the occult and divinatory applications of the deck, and originate with Jean-Baptiste Pitois, writing under the name Paul Christian.[2]
Dummett writes that originally the Major Arcana had simple allegorical or exoteric meaning, mostly originating in elite ideology in the Italian courts of the 15th century when it was invented.[3] The occult significance only began to emerge in the 18th century when Antoine Court de Gébelin (a Swiss clergyman and Freemason) published Le Monde Primitif. The construction of the occult and divinatory significance of the Tarot, and the Major and Minor Arcana, continued on from there.[4] For example, Antoine Court de Gébelin argued for the Egyptian, kabbalastic, and divine significance of the Tarot trumps: Etteilla created a method of divination using Tarot: Eliphas Lévi worked hard to break away from the Egyptian nature of the divinatory Tarot, bringing it back to the Tarot de Marsailles, creating a “tortuous” kabbalastic correspondence, and even suggested that the Major Arcana represent stages of life.[2] The Marquis Stanislas de Guaita established the Major Arcana as an initiatory sequence to be used by initiates to establish their path of spiritual ascension and evolution.[3] Finally Salie Nichols, a Jungian psychologist, wrote up the tarot as having deep psychological and archetypal significance, even going so far as to encode the entire process of Jungian individuation into the Tarot trumps.[5] These various interpretations of the Major Arcana developed in stages, all of which continue to exert significant influence on our understanding of the Major Arcana even to this day.

Maleficium:

Maleficium is a Latin term meaning “wrongdoing” or “mischief”[1] and is used to describe malevolent, dangerous, or harmful magic, “evildoing,”[2] or “malevolent sorcery.”[3] In general, the term applies to any magical act intended to cause harm or death to people or property. Maleficium can involve the act of poisoning or drugging someone with Pharmakeia. It is often used in witchcraft and necromancy.
The term appears in several historically important texts, notably the Formicarius, and the Malleus Maleficarum.
The Knights Templar were also accused of maleficium. The Trial of the Knights Templar set a social standard for the popular belief in maleficium and witchcraft which contributed to the great European witch hunt.[4]
In modern Papua New Guinea and the Torres Strait area, it is called puripuri.[5]

Malleus Maleficarum:

The Malleus Maleficarum[2] (commonly rendered into English as “Hammer of [the] Witches”;[3] Der Hexenhammer in German) is a treatise on the prosecution of witches, written in 1486 by Heinrich Kramer, a German Catholic clergyman. The book was first published in Speyer, Germany, in 1487.[4] James Sprenger is also often attributed as an author, but some scholars now believe that he became associated with the Malleus Maleficarum largely as a result of Kramer’s wish to lend his book as much official authority as possible.[5]
The main purpose of the Malleus was to systematically refute arguments claiming that witchcraft does not exist, to discredit those who expressed skepticism about its reality, to claim that those who practised witchcraft were more often women than men, and to educate magistrates on the procedures that could find them out and convict them.[6]

Mare (demon):

A demon which during the night will sit on your chest, causing feelings of suffocation. Mare occasionally refers to the nightmare dream itself. Often it is interchanggably used with incubus.

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft (page 340)

Mars:

Planet of Passion

Mars is the action planet of the zodiac. The ‘Red Planet,’ after all, should be pretty fiery, and Mars does not disappoint. Energy, passion, drive and determination are all right up Mars’s alley. This planet commands you (and yes, Mars does rule the military) to stand up, be noticed and get things done — sitting on the sidelines belongs somewhere else in the heavens. Simply put, Mars speaks to the power and confident expression of the individual.

MDMA:

MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine) is an empathogenic drug of the phenethylamine and amphetamine classes of drugs. MDMA has become widely known as “ecstasy” (shortened to “E”, “X”, or “XTC”), usually referring to its street form, although this term may also include the presence of possible adulterants. The UK term “Mandy” and the US term “Molly” colloquially refer to MDMA that is relatively free of adulterants.[3]

Mercury:

Planet of Communication

Mercury, much like the winged messenger of the gods, comes in on feather-light wings and commands us to speak. Communication, intellect and awareness are all within Mercury’s domain, as are logic and reasoning, our manner of thinking, and how we create and express our thought processes.

MK Ultra:

Project MKUltra is the code name of a U.S. government human research operation experimenting in the behavioral engineering of humans through the CIA’s Scientific Intelligence Division. The CIA project was coordinated with the Special Operations Division of the Army’s Chemical Corps.1 The program began in the early 1950s, was officially sanctioned in 1953, was reduced in scope in 1964, further curtailed in 1967 and officially halted in 1973.[2] The program engaged in many illegal activities;[3][2][5] in particular it used unwitting U.S. and Canadian citizens as its test subjects, which led to controversy regarding its legitimacy.3[6][3][8] MKUltra used numerous methodologies to manipulate people’s mental states and alter brain functions, including the surreptitious administration of drugs (especially LSD) and other chemicals, hypnosis, sensory deprivation, isolation, verbal and sexual abuse, as well as various forms of torture.[9]
The scope of Project MKUltra was broad, with research undertaken at 80 institutions, including 44 colleges and universities, as well as hospitals, prisons and pharmaceutical companies.[10] The CIA operated through these institutions using front organizations, although sometimes top officials at these institutions were aware of the CIA’s involvement.[11] As the Supreme Court later noted, MKULTRA was:
concerned with “the research and development of chemical, biological, and radiological materials capable of employment in clandestine operations to control human behavior.” The program consisted of some 149 subprojects which the Agency contracted out to various universities, research foundations, and similar institutions. At least 80 institutions and 185 private researchers participated. Because the Agency funded MKULTRA indirectly, many of the participating individuals were unaware that they were dealing with the Agency.[12]
Project MKUltra was first brought to public attention in 1975 by the Church Committee of the U.S. Congress, and a Gerald Ford commission to investigate CIA activities within the United States. Investigative efforts were hampered by the fact that CIA Director Richard Helms ordered all MKUltra files destroyed in 1973; the Church Committee and Rockefeller Commission investigations relied on the sworn testimony of direct participants and on the relatively small number of documents that survived Helms’ destruction order.[13]
In 1977, a Freedom of Information Act request uncovered a cache of 20,000 documents relating to project MKUltra, which led to Senate hearings later that same year.[3] In July 2001 some surviving information regarding MKUltra was officially declassified.

Moloch:

Moloch, also rendered as Molech, Molekh, Molok, Molek, Molock, Moloc, Melech, Milcom, or Molcom (representing Semitic מלך m-l-k, a Semitic root meaning “king”) is the name of an ancient Ammonite god.1 Moloch worship was practiced by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, and related cultures in North Africa and the Levant.
As a god worshipped by the Phoenicians and Canaanites, Moloch had associations with a particular kind of propitiatory child sacrifice by parents. Moloch figures in the Book of Deuteronomy and in the Book of Leviticus as a form of idolatry (Leviticus 18:21: “And thou shalt not let any of thy seed pass through the fire to Moloch”). In the Old Testament, Gehenna was a valley by Jerusalem, where apostate Israelites and followers of various Baalim and Caananite gods, including Moloch, sacrificed their children by fire (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2–6).
Moloch has been used figuratively in English literature from John Milton’s Paradise Lost (1667) to Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” (1955), to refer to a person or thing demanding or requiring a very costly sacrifice.

Monarch Mind Control:

The Monarch Mind Control designation was originally applied by the US Department of Defense to a sub-program under the CIA’s MK-Ultra Program. However, the techniques employed in the Monarch programming system extend back further under various names, such as the Nazi marionette programming.

Even further back, the techniques used in Monarch programming can be traced to various generational Satanist families among European royalty. The MPD state created by the Monarch programming techniques were used to isolate the personality involved in Satanic rituals from a public face. Without this alternate personality, the nobles practicing Satanism inevitably went insane, so it’s practice spread rapidly through the occult community.

It is unclear who first started practicing the MPD techniques as a way of creating mind control slaves rather than as a defense mechanism, but it is clear that the Nazis were using Electro-shock and binding to create slaves in the 1940s. After World War II, some German and Italian psychologists who were working on Marionette programming were brought to the United States to continue working on their research.

After the original development of the Monarch program inside of MK-Ultra, it has been adopted by other groups such as the Illuminati and the American entertainment industry. Very notably, since the 1970’s the Disney corporation has been involved heavily in Monarch programming, and several of their films (especially Alice in Wonderland) are used as a base for Monarch programming.

Over 1 million Americans have had Monarch programming applied to them.1

Monarch programming is achieved through repeated abuse and torture, until the victim dissociates from reality into a fantasy world in their head. When that happens somehow an alternate personality is created, and the handler (abuser) can trigger this personality at any time.

Beta programming is sex kitten programming, used to create “ultimate prostitutes” as well as celebrities used to sell sex in the media to the masses. Making it look cool and awesome to be sexually abused and over used. They are made to be devoid of all sexual inhibitions. Take a look at Courtney Stodden.

Delta programming is used to program soldiers and patsys to carry out ritualistic murders.

Moon:

Ruler of the Emotions

Since the Moon is the closest ‘Planet’ to Earth, this satellite literally zips around the zodiac, completing its circuit in less than a month. It also touches us more deeply than most planets.

The Moon (Tarot Card):

The Moon (XVIII) is the eighteenth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

According to Waite’s The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, the card represents life of the imagination apart from life of the spirit. The dog and wolf are the fears of the natural mind in the presence of that place of exit, when there is only reflected light to guide it. This reference is a key to another form of symbolism. The intellectual light is a mere reflection and beyond it is the unknown mystery which it cannot reveal. It illuminates our animal nature, types of which are represented below—the dog, the wolf, and that which comes up out of the deeps, the nameless and hideous tendency which is lower even than the savage beast. It strives to attain manifestation, symbolized by crawling from the abyss of water to the land, but as a rule it sinks back whence it came. The face of the mind directs a calm gaze upon the unrest below, and the dew of thought falls. The message is: “Peace, be still,” and it may be that there shall come a calm upon the animal nature, while the abyss beneath shall cease from giving up form.
Some frequent keywords are:
Lack of clarity —– Tension —– Doubt —– Fantasy
Deception —– Psychological conflict —– Obscured vision
Confusion —– Illusion —– Fear —– Imagination —– Worry
Romanticism —– Anxiety —– Apprehension —– Unrealistic ideas

Neptune:

Planet of Illusion

Neptune, another of the outer planets, was discovered in 1846. Its slow orbit around our zodiac ensures that its effect is generational in nature.

Neptune’s glyph is the trident of Poseidon, God of the Seas. Much about this planet is fluid (Neptune rules the oceans of the Earth), changeable and illusory in nature. Dreams, illusion, abstract thought and the mysterious are all governed by Neptune. Our spirituality is important to this planet, and how we harness that energy for our personal betterment. Neptune invites us to let its energy wash over us and to use a meditative state to gain insights and heightened awareness. Poetry, music and dance are among the trance-like activities which this planet favors.

New Age:

The New Age movement is a Western spiritual movement that developed in the second half of the 20th century. Its central precepts have been described as “drawing on both Eastern and Western spiritual and metaphysical traditions and infusing them with influences from self-help and motivational psychology, holistic health, parapsychology, consciousness research and quantum physics”.[2] The term New Age refers to the coming astrological Age of Aquarius.1
The movement aims to create “a spirituality without borders or confining dogmas” that is inclusive and pluralistic.[3] It holds to “a holistic worldview”,[4] emphasising that the Mind, Body, and Spirit are interrelated1 and that there is a form of monism and unity throughout the universe.[5] It attempts to create “a worldview that includes both science and spirituality”[6] and embraces a number of forms of mainstream science as well as other forms of science that are considered fringe.
The origins of the movement can be found in Medieval astrology and alchemy, such as the writings of Paracelsus, in Renaissance interests in Hermeticism, in 18th-century mysticism, such as that of Emanuel Swedenborg, and in beliefs in animal magnetism espoused by Franz Mesmer. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, authors such as Godfrey Higgins and the esotericists Eliphas Levi, Helena Blavatsky, and George Gurdjieff articulated specific histories, cosmologies, and some of the basic philosophical principles that would influence the movement. It experienced a revival as a result of the work of individuals such as Alice Bailey and organizations such as the Theosophical Society. It gained further momentum in the 1960s, taking influence from metaphysics, perennial philosophy, self-help psychology, and the various Indian gurus who visited the West during that decade.[7] In the 1970s, it developed a social and political component.[8]
The New Age movement includes elements of older spiritual and religious traditions ranging from monotheism through pantheism, pandeism, panentheism, and polytheism combined with science and Gaia philosophy; particularly archaeoastronomy, astronomy, ecology, environmentalism, the Gaia hypothesis, UFO religions, psychology, and physics.
New Age practices and philosophies sometimes draw inspiration from major world religions: Buddhism, Taoism, Chinese folk religion, Christianity, Hinduism, Sufism (Islam), Judaism (especially Kabbalah), Sikhism; with strong influences from East Asian religions, Esotericism, Gnosticism, Hermeticism, Idealism, Neopaganism, New Thought, Spiritualism, Theosophy, Universalism, and Wisdom tradition.[9]

New Clear Temple:

Evolve and Ascend’s temple of knowledge featuring everything you need to know including the Esoteric Encyclopedia, Video Vault, Alien Nation, and Key Players.

Night Spell:

A charm against harm by night, especially against a nightmare or mare.

Orgone Energy:

Orgone energy is a hypothetical universal life force originally proposed in the 1930s by Wilhelm Reich.1[2][3] In its final conception, developed by Reich’s student Charles Kelly after Reich’s death, Orgone was conceived as the anti-entropic principle of the universe, a creative substratum in all of nature comparable to Mesmer’s animal magnetism, the Odic force of Carl Reichenbach and Henri Bergson’s élan vital.[4] Orgone was seen as a massless, omnipresent substance, similar to luminiferous aether, but more closely associated with living energy than inert matter. It could coalesce to create organization on all scales, from the smallest microscopic units—called bions in orgone theory—to macroscopic structures like organisms, clouds, or even galaxies.[5]
Reich’s theories held that deficits or constrictions in bodily orgone were at the root of many diseases—including cancer—much as deficits or constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses in Freudian theory. He created the Orgone Institute to pursue research into orgone energy after he immigrated to the US, and used it to publish literature and distribute material relating to the topic for more than a decade. Reich designed special “orgone accumulators”—devices ostensibly collecting and storing orgone energy from the environment—for improvement of general health or even for weather control.1 Ultimately, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) obtained a federal injunction barring the interstate distribution of orgone-related materials, on the grounds that Reich and his associates were making false and misleading claims, and later jailed Reich and destroyed all orgone-related materials at the institute after Reich violated the injunction.[2] Contrary to common misconception, Reich always rejected the idea that the accumulator could provide orgastic potency.[6]
Orgone is regarded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine as a type of “putative energy”, a model which some therapists use for clinical procedures, for which specific measurement machines can be built.[7] There is no empirical support for the concept of orgone in medicine or the physical sciences, and research into the concept ceased with the end of the Institute.[8]

Orgonite:

In 2000, a couple named Don and Carol Croft discovered through some Internet research and empirical observation that mixing catalyzed organic fiberglass resin with inorganic metal shavings, poured into small molds such as paper cups and muffin pans, would produce a substance which would attract etheric energy similarly to Reich’s accumulators. Orgonite Diagram

Carol Croft, gifted with a keen sense of discrete energies, realized the significance of this finding and took it a step further by adding small quartz crystals to the mixture for their ability to efficiently collect, transmute and emit etheric energy. This addition to the resin/metal matrix creates a substance which functions as a self-driven, continuously-operating, highly efficient DOR→POR (negative to positive) energy transmutation factory.

When orgonite is within range of a source of DOR/negative energy, it will efficiently and continuously transform it into POR/positive energy as it is being transmitted, which essentially creates positive energy transmitters out of any and all emitters of harmful negative energy, which are totally defenseless against the effect.

The resin in orgonite shrinks during the curing process, permanently squeezing the quartz crystal inside which creates a well-known piezoelectric effect inside the crystal, meaning its end-points become polarized electrically. It is believed this is also what causes the orgonite to function so effectively as a positive energy generator.

Thus orgonite represents a very significant improvement over Reich’s early work with orgone accumulators, since Reich’s “oracs” attract deadly orgone energy as well as positive and do nothing to transmute it into a purely beneficial form, which orgonite does inherently and continuously.

Within a year of this development, Don began publishing reports of his and his wife’s experiences in, among other things, the tactical deployment of small pieces of orgonite near any and all sources of DOR, or life-negative energy, such as cellphone towers, nuclear power plants, underground bases and natural Earth energy gridlines and vorticies. Don included in his reports the specific life-positive, cleansing, healing, confirming effects they would notice following such “gifting” activities, causing Don to strongly encourage his readers to replicate his efforts in their own communities.

Pact with the Devil:

The pact with the Devil was the essence of witchcraft. The pact pinpointed sorcery as heresy and thereby brought witchcraft under the jurisdiction of the INquisition. (come back to this page 369 witch craft book)

Paganism:

Pagan religions (also Paganism) refers to a group of historical polytheistic religious traditions—primarily those of cultures known to the classical world. In a wider sense, it has also been understood to include any non-Abrahamic, folk, or ethnic religion.
Modern paganism, also known as contemporary paganism, and neopaganism, is a group of contemporary religious movements influenced by or claiming to be derived from the various historical pagan beliefs of pre-modern Europe.1[2] Although they do share commonalities, contemporary Pagan religious movements are diverse and no single set of beliefs, practices, or texts are shared by them all.[3] Since the 20th century, “Paganism” (or “Neopaganism”) has become the identifier for a collection of new religious movements attempting to continue, revive, or reconstruct historical pre-Abrahamic religion.[4]

Paradigm:

A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline.

Petrus Romanus:

In recent times, some interpreters of prophetic literature have drawn attention to the prophecies due to their imminent conclusion; if the list of descriptions is matched on a one-to-one basis to the list of historic popes since the prophecies’ publication, Benedict XVI (2005-2013) would correspond to the second to last of the papal descriptions, Gloria olivae (the glory of the olive).[12]
The longest and final prophecy predicts the Apocalypse:[13]
In persecutione extrema S.R.E. sedebit.
Petrus Romanus, qui pascet oves in multis tribulationibus, quibus transactis civitas septicollis diruetur, & judex tremendus judicabit populum suum. Finis.
This may be translated into English as:
In the final persecution of the Holy Roman Church, there will sit [i.e., as bishop].
Peter the Roman, who will pasture his sheep in many tribulations, and when these things are finished, the city of seven hills [i.e. Rome] will be destroyed, and the dreadful judge will judge his people. The End.[14]
Several historians and interpreters of the prophecies note that they leave open the possibility of unlisted popes between “the glory of the olive” and the final pope, “Peter the Roman”.[5][2] In the Lignum Vitae, the line In persecutione extrema S.R.E. sedebit. forms a separate sentence and paragraph of its own. While often read as part of the “Peter the Roman” prophecy, other interpreters view it as a separate, incomplete sentence explicitly referring to additional popes between “the glory of the olive” and “Peter the Roman”. (see Prophecy of the Popes)

Peyote:

Lophophora williamsii /loʊˈfɒfərə wɪlˈjæmsiaɪ/ is a small, spineless cactus with psychoactive alkaloids, particularly mescaline.[2] The Spanish common name, also used in English, is peyote[3] (/pəˈjoʊti/; from the Nahuatl word peyōtl [‘pejoːt͡ɬ]), which means “glisten” or “glistening”.[4] [2] Native North Americans are likely to have used peyote for at least 5,500 years.[6]
Peyote is native to southwestern Texas and Mexico. It is found primarily in the Chihuahuan desert and in the states of Coahuila, Nuevo León, Tamaulipas and San Luis Potosi among scrub, especially where there is limestone.
Known for its psychoactive properties when ingested, peyote is used worldwide as an entheogen and supplement to various transcendence practices, including meditation, psychonautics, and psychedelic psychotherapy. Peyote has a long history of ritualistic and medicinal use by indigenous Americans. It flowers from March through May, and sometimes as late as September. The flowers are pink, with thigmotactic anthers (like Opuntia).

The Philosopher’s Stone:

The philosophers’ stone or stone of the philosophers (Latin: lapis philosophorum) is a legendary alchemical substance said to be capable of turning base metals such as lead into gold (chrysopoeia) or silver. It was also sometimes believed to be an elixir of life, useful for rejuvenation and possibly for achieving immortality. For many centuries, it was the most sought-after goal in alchemy. The philosophers’ stone was the central symbol of the mystical terminology of alchemy, symbolizing perfection at its finest, enlightenment, and heavenly bliss. Efforts to discover the philosophers’ stone were known as the Magnum Opus (“Great Work”).1

Piri Reis Map:

The Piri Reis map is a pre-modern world map compiled in 1513 from military intelligence by the Ottoman admiral and cartographer Piri Reis (pronounced [piɾi ɾeis]). Approximately one-third of the map survives; it shows the western coasts of Europe and North Africa and the coast of Brazil with reasonable accuracy. Various Atlantic islands including the Azores and Canary Islands are depicted, as is the mythical island of Antillia and possibly Japan.
The historical importance of the map lies in its demonstration of the extent of exploration of the New World by approximately 1510, and in its claim to have used Columbus’s maps, otherwise lost, as a source. It used ten Arabian sources, four Indian maps sourced from the Portuguese and one map of Columbus. More recently it has been the focus of pseudohistoric claims for the premodern exploration of the Antarctic coast.

Pisces:

February 19 – March 20

Pisces is the twelfth sign of the zodiac, and it is also the final sign in the zodiacal cycle. Hence, this sign brings together many of the characteristics of the eleven signs that have come before it. Pisces, however, are happiest keeping many of these qualities under wraps. These folks are selfless, spiritual and very focused on their inner journey. They also place great weight on what they are feeling. Yes, feelings define Pisces, and it’s not uncommon for them to feel their own burdens (and joys) as well as those of others. The intuition of the Pisces-born is highly evolved. Many people associate Pisces with dreams and secrets, and it’s a fair association, since those born under this sign feel comfortable in an illusory world.

Plane (esotericism):

In esoteric cosmology, a plane other than the physical plane is conceived as a subtle state of consciousness that transcends the known physical universe.
The concept may be found in religious and esoteric teachings—e.g. Vedanta (Advaita Vedanta), Ayyavazhi, shamanism, Hermeticism, Neoplatonism, Gnosticism, Kashmir Shaivism, Sant Mat/Surat Shabd Yoga, Sufism, Druze, Kabbalah, Theosophy, Anthroposophy, Rosicrucianism (Esoteric Christian), Eckankar, Ascended Master Teachings, etc.—which propound the idea of a whole series of subtle planes or worlds or dimensions which, from a center, interpenetrate themselves and the physical planet in which we live, the solar systems, and all the physical structures of the universe. This interpenetration of planes culminates in the universe itself as a physical structured, dynamic and evolutive expression emanated through a series of steadily denser stages, becoming progressively more material and embodied.
The emanation is conceived, according to esoteric teachings, to have been originated, at the dawn of the universe’s manifestation, in The Supreme Being Who sent out—from the unmanifested Absolute beyond comprehension—the dynamic force of creative energy, as sound-vibration (“the Word”), into the abyss of space. Alternatively, it states that this dynamic force is being sent forth, through the ages, framing all things that constitute and inhabit the universe.

Pluto:

Planet of Power

As the outermost planet in our solar system, Pluto is also the farthest from the Sun. It has only recently been discovered, having come to light (albeit a dim one) in 1930.

Pluto’s energy may be subtle, but its results will hit you like a ton of bricks. This planet is about transformation, regeneration and rebirth. Things aren’t pretty with Pluto, but they do get done. Pluto says ‘out with the old and in with the new,’ and we’d better be ready for it. If we’re not, this planet will simply have us wallow in our misery. Pluto asks us to transcend that which we know, redeem ourselves in the process, and come out stronger as a result.

Poltergeist:

In folklore and parapsychology, a poltergeist is a type of ghost or other supernatural being supposedly responsible for physical disturbances such as loud noises and objects moved around or destroyed. Most accounts of poltergeists describe movement or levitation of objects, such as furniture and cutlery, or noises such as knocking on doors. Poltergeists have also been claimed to be capable of pinching, biting, hitting and tripping people.
Poltergeists occupy numerous niches in cultural folklore, and have traditionally been described as troublesome spirits who haunt a particular person instead of a specific location. Such alleged poltergeist manifestations have been reported in many cultures and countries including the United States, Japan,1 Brazil, Australia, and most European nations, with early accounts dating back to the 1st century

Poppet:

In folk-magic and witchcraft, a poppet, also known as Poppits, Moppets, Mommets and Pippies is a doll made to represent a person, for casting spells on that person or to aid that person through magic. They are occasionally found lodged in chimneys.[2] These dolls may be fashioned from such materials as a carved root, grain or corn shafts, a fruit, paper, wax, a potato, clay, branches, or cloth stuffed with herbs with the intent that any actions performed upon the effigy will be transferred to the subject based on sympathetic magic. It was from these European dolls that the myth of Voodoo dolls arose.[2][2] Poppets are also used as kitchen witch figures.

Possession:

Demonic possession, psychokinetic control of a person by the Devil or other malevolent spirit.

Spirit possession, psychokinetic control of the behavior of a living thing or natural object by a spiritual being.

Potion:

A potion (from Latin potio “drink”, in turn derived from Greek poton “that which one drinks”) is a consumable medicine or poison.
In mythology and literature, a potion is usually made by a magician, sorcerer, dragon, fairy or witch and has magical properties. It might be used to heal, bewitch or poison people. For example, love potions make a person fall in love (or become deeply infatuated) with another (the love potion figures tragically into most versions of the tale of Tristan and Iseult, including Richard Wagner’s opera Tristan und Isolde); sleeping potions cause a person to fall asleep (in folklore, this can range from normal sleep to a deathlike trance); and elixirs heal/cure any wound/malady (as in C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe). Goscinny and Uderzo’s character Asterix the Gaul gained superhuman strength from a magic potion brewed by the druid Getafix.
Creation of potions of different kinds was a common practice of alchemy, and was commonly associated with witchcraft, as in The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare.
During the 19th Century, it was common in certain countries to see wandering charlatans offering curative potions.

Primum Mobile:

In classical, medieval and Renaissance astronomy, the Primum Mobile, or “first moved,” was the outermost moving sphere in the geocentric model of the universe.

Project Bluebook:

Project Blue Book was one of a series of systematic studies of unidentified flying objects (UFOs) conducted by the United States Air Force. Started in 1952, it was the second revival of such a study (the first two of its kind being Projects Sign and Grudge). A termination order was given for the study in December 1969, and all activity under its auspices ceased in January 1970.
Project Blue Book had two goals:
to determine if UFOs were a threat to national security, and
to scientifically analyze UFO-related data.
Thousands of UFO reports were collected, analyzed and filed. As the result of the Condon Report (1968), which concluded there was nothing anomalous about UFOs, Project Blue Book was ordered shut down in December 1969 and the Air Force continues to provide the following summary of its investigations:
No UFO reported, investigated and evaluated by the Air Force was ever an indication of threat to our national security;
There was no evidence submitted to or discovered by the Air Force that sightings categorized as “unidentified” represented technological developments or principles beyond the range of modern scientific knowledge; and
There was no evidence indicating that sightings categorized as “unidentified” were extraterrestrial vehicles.1
By the time Project Blue Book ended, it had collected 12,618 UFO reports, and concluded that most of them were misidentifications of natural phenomena (clouds, stars, etc.) or conventional aircraft. According to the National Reconnaissance Office a number of the reports could be explained by flights of the formerly secret reconnaissance planes U-2 and A-12.[2] A small percentage of UFO reports were classified as unexplained, even after stringent analysis. The UFO reports were archived and are available under the Freedom of Information Act, but names and other personal information of all witnesses have been redacted.

Psilocybin:

Psilocybin is a naturally occurring psychedelic compound produced by more than 200 species of mushrooms, collectively known as psilocybin mushrooms. The most potent are members of the genus Psilocybe, such as P. azurescens, P. semilanceata, and P. cyanescens, but psilocybin has also been isolated from about a dozen other genera. As a prodrug, psilocybin is quickly converted by the body to psilocin, which has mind-altering effects similar (in some aspects) to those of LSD, mescaline, and DMT. The effects generally include euphoria, visual and mental hallucinations, changes in perception, a distorted sense of time, and spiritual experiences, and can include possible adverse reactions such as nausea and panic attacks.

Prophecy:

Prophecy is a process in which one or more messages that have been communicated to a prophet1 are then communicated to others. Such messages typically involve divine inspiration, interpretation, or revelation of conditioned events to come (cf. divine knowledge) as well as testimonies or repeated revelations that the world is divine.[citation needed] The process of prophecy especially involves reciprocal communication of the prophet with the (divine) source of the messages. Throughout history, clairvoyance has commonly been used and associated with prophecy.[2]
Various concepts of prophecy are found throughout all of the world’s religions and cults. To a certain degree prophecy can be an integral concept within any religion or cult. The term has found deep usage in the Abrahamic religions, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Baha’i along with many others.[3]

Prophecy of the Popes:

The Prophecy of the Popes (Latin: Prophetia Sancti Malachiae Archiepiscopi, de Summis Pontificibus) is a series of 112 short, cryptic phrases in Latin which purport to predict the Roman Catholic popes (along with a few antipopes), beginning with Pope Celestine II. The alleged prophecies were first published by Benedictine monk Arnold Wion in 1595. Wion attributes the prophecies to Saint Malachy, a 12th‑century Archbishop of Armagh, Ireland.
Given the very accurate description of popes up to 1590 and lack of accuracy after that year, historians generally conclude that the alleged prophecies are a fabrication written shortly before they were published. The Roman Catholic Church also dismisses them as forgery.1[2] The prophecies may have been created in an attempt to suggest that Cardinal Girolamo Simoncelli’s bid for the papacy in the second conclave of 1590 was divinely ordained.

Qi:

In traditional Chinese culture, qi (also chi or ch’i) is an active principle forming part of any living thing.1[2][3] Qi is frequently translated as “natural energy”, “life force”, or “energy flow”. Qi is the central underlying principle in traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts. The literal translation of “qi” is “breath”, “air”, or “gas”.
Concepts similar to qi can be found in many cultures, for example, prana and cit in Hindu religion, mana in Hawaiian culture, lüng in Tibetan Buddhism, ruah in Hebrew culture, and Vital energy in Western philosophy. Some elements of qi can be understood in the term energy when used by writers and practitioners of various esoteric forms of spirituality and alternative medicine. Elements of the qi concept can also be found in Western popular culture, for example “The Force” in Star Wars.[4] Notions in the West of energeia, élan vital, or “vitalism” are purported to be similar.[5]

Quantum Mechanics:

Quantum mechanics (QM – also known as quantum physics, or quantum theory) is a branch of physics which deals with physical phenomena at nanoscopic scales, where the action is on the order of the Planck constant. It departs from classical mechanics primarily at the quantum realm of atomic and subatomic length scales. Quantum mechanics provides a mathematical description of much of the dual particle-like and wave-like behavior and interactions of energy and matter. It is the non-relativistic limit of quantum field theory (QFT), a theory that was developed later that combined quantum mechanics with relativity.
In advanced topics of quantum mechanics, some of these behaviors are macroscopic (see macroscopic quantum phenomena) and emerge at only extreme (i.e., very low or very high) energies or temperatures (such as in the use of superconducting magnets). The name quantum mechanics derives from the observation that some physical quantities can change only in discrete amounts (Latin quanta), and not in a continuous (cf. analog) way. For example, the angular momentum of an electron bound to an atom or molecule is quantized.1 In the context of quantum mechanics, the wave–particle duality of energy and matter and the uncertainty principle provide a unified view of the behavior of photons, electrons, and other atomic-scale objects.
The mathematical formulations of quantum mechanics are abstract. A mathematical function known as the wavefunction provides information about the probability amplitude of position, momentum, and other physical properties of a particle. Mathematical manipulations of the wavefunction usually involve the bra-ket notation, which requires an understanding of complex numbers and linear functionals. The wavefunction treats the object as a quantum harmonic oscillator, and the mathematics is akin to that describing acoustic resonance. Many of the results of quantum mechanics are not easily visualized in terms of classical mechanics—for instance, the ground state in a quantum mechanical model is a non-zero energy state that is the lowest permitted energy state of a system, as opposed to a more “traditional” system that is thought of as simply being at rest, with zero kinetic energy. Instead of a traditional static, unchanging zero state, quantum mechanics allows for far more dynamic, chaotic possibilities, according to John Wheeler.
The earliest versions of quantum mechanics were formulated in the first decade of the 20th century. At around the same time, the atomic theory and the corpuscular theory of light (as updated by Einstein) first came to be widely accepted as scientific fact; these latter theories can be viewed as quantum theories of matter and electromagnetic radiation, respectively. Early quantum theory was significantly reformulated in the mid-1920s by Werner Heisenberg, Max Born and Pascual Jordan, who created matrix mechanics; Louis de Broglie and Erwin Schrödinger (wave mechanics); and Wolfgang Pauli and Satyendra Nath Bose (statistics of subatomic particles). Moreover, the Copenhagen interpretation of Niels Bohr became widely accepted. By 1930, quantum mechanics had been further unified and formalized by the work of David Hilbert, Paul Dirac and John von Neumann,[2] with a greater emphasis placed on measurement in quantum mechanics, the statistical nature of our knowledge of reality, and philosophical speculation about the role of the observer. Quantum mechanics has since branched out into almost every aspect of 20th-century physics and other disciplines, such as quantum chemistry, quantum electronics, quantum optics, and quantum information science. Much 19th-century physics has been re-evaluated as the “classical limit” of quantum mechanics, and its more advanced developments in terms of quantum field theory, string theory, and speculative quantum gravity theories.

Reiki:

Reiki (霊気?, /ˈreɪkiː/) is a spiritual practice1 developed in 1922 by Japanese Buddhist Mikao Usui, which has since been adapted by various teachers of varying traditions. It uses a technique commonly called palm healing or hands-on-healing as a form of alternative medicine and is sometimes classified as oriental medicine by some professional medical bodies.[2] Through the use of this technique, practitioners believe that they are transferring universal energy (i.e., reiki) in the form of qi (Japanese: ki) through the palms, which they believe allows for self-healing and a state of equilibrium.[3]
There are two main branches of Reiki, commonly referred to as Traditional Japanese Reiki and Western Reiki. Though differences can be wide and varied between both branches and traditions, the primary difference is that the Westernised forms use systematised hand-placements rather than relying on an intuitive sense of hand-positions (see below), which is commonly used by Japanese Reiki branches. Both branches commonly have a three-tiered hierarchy of degrees, usually referred to as the First, Second, and Master/Teacher level, all of which are associated with different skills and techniques.
The concept of ki underlying Reiki is speculative and there is no scientific evidence that it exists; a 2008 systematic review of randomised clinical trials concluded that “the evidence is insufficient to suggest that reiki is an effective treatment for any condition. Therefore the value of reiki remains unproven.”[4] The American Cancer Society,[5] Cancer Research UK,[6] and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine[7] have also found that there is no clinical or scientific evidence supporting claims that Reiki is effective in the treatment of any illness.

Roswell UFO Incident:

The Roswell UFO incident took place in the U.S. in June or July 1947, when an airborne object crashed on a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico. Explanations of what took place are based on both official and unofficial communications. Although the crash is attributed to a secret U.S. military Air Force surveillance balloon by the U.S. government,1 the most famous explanation of what occurred is that the object was a spacecraft containing extraterrestrial life. Since the late 1970s, the Roswell incident has been the subject of much controversy, and conspiracy theories have arisen about the event.
The United States Armed Forces maintains that what was recovered near Roswell was debris from the crash of an experimental high-altitude surveillance balloon belonging to what was then a classified (top secret) program named Mogul. In contrast, many UFO proponents maintain that an alien craft was found, its occupants were captured, and that the military engaged in a massive cover-up. The Roswell incident has turned into a widely known pop culture phenomenon, making the name “Roswell” synonymous with UFOs. Roswell has become the most publicized of all alleged UFO incidents.
On July 8, 1947, the Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF) public information officer Walter Haut, issued a press release stating that personnel from the field’s 509th Operations Group had recovered a “flying disk”, which had crashed on a ranch near Roswell. Later that day, the press reported that Commanding General of the Eighth Air Force Roger Ramey had stated that a weather balloon was recovered by the RAAF personnel. A press conference was held, featuring debris (foil, rubber and wood) said to be from the crashed object, which seemed to confirm its description as a weather balloon.
Subsequently the incident faded from the attention of UFO researchers for over 30 years. In 1978, physicist and ufologist Stanton T. Friedman interviewed Major Jesse Marcel who was involved with the original recovery of the debris in 1947. Marcel expressed his belief that the military covered up the recovery of an alien spacecraft. His story spread through UFO circles, being featured in some UFO documentaries at the time. In February 1980, the National Enquirer ran its own interview with Marcel, garnering national and worldwide attention for the Roswell incident. Additional witnesses added significant new details, including claims of a large-scale military operation dedicated to recovering alien craft and aliens themselves, at as many as 11 crash sites, and alleged witness intimidation. In 1989, former mortician Glenn Dennis put forth a detailed personal account, wherein he claimed alien autopsies were carried out at the Roswell base.
In response to these reports, and after United States congressional inquiries, the General Accounting Office launched an inquiry and directed the Office of the United States Secretary of the Air Force to conduct an internal investigation. The result was summarized in two reports. The first, released in 1995, concluded that the reported recovered material in 1947 was likely debris from Project Mogul. The second report, released in 1997, concluded reports of recovered alien bodies were likely a combination of innocently transformed memories of military accidents involving injured or killed personnel, innocently transformed memories of the recovery of anthropomorphic dummies in military programs like Operation High Dive conducted in the 1950s, and hoaxes perpetrated by various witnesses and UFO proponents. The psychological effects of time compression and confusion about when events occurred explained the discrepancy with the years in question. These reports were dismissed by UFO proponents as being either disinformation or simply implausible. But at the same time, several high-profile UFO researchers discounted the possibility that the incident had anything to do with aliens.

Runes:

Runes (Proto-Norse: ᚱᚢᚾᛟ (runo), Old Norse: rún) are the letters in a set of related alphabets known as runic alphabets, which were used to write various Germanic languages before the adoption of the Latin alphabet and for specialised purposes thereafter. The Scandinavian variants are also known as futhark or fuþark (derived from their first six letters of the alphabet: F, U, Þ, A, R, and K); the Anglo-Saxon variant is futhorc or fuþorc (due to sound changes undergone in Old English by the same six letters).
Runology is the study of the runic alphabets, runic inscriptions, runestones, and their history. Runology forms a specialised branch of Germanic linguistics.
The earliest runic inscriptions date from around AD 150. The characters were generally replaced by the Latin alphabet as the cultures that had used runes underwent Christianisation, by approximately AD 700 in central Europe and AD 1100 in Northern Europe. However, the use of runes persisted for specialized purposes in Northern Europe. Until the early 20th century, runes were used in rural Sweden for decorative purposes in Dalarna and on Runic calendars.
The three best-known runic alphabets are the Elder Futhark (around AD 150–800), the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc (AD 400–1100), and the Younger Futhark (AD 800–1100). The Younger Futhark is divided further into the long-branch runes (also called Danish, although they also were used in Norway and Sweden); short-branch or Rök runes (also called Swedish-Norwegian, although they also were used in Denmark); and the stavesyle or Hälsinge runes (staveless runes). The Younger Futhark developed further into the Marcomannic runes, the Medieval runes (AD 1100–1500), and the Dalecarlian runes (around AD 1500–1800).
Historically, the runic alphabet is a derivation of the Old Italic alphabets of antiquity, with the addition of some innovations. Which variant of the Old Italic family in particular gave rise to the runes is uncertain. Suggestions include Raetic, Etruscan, or Old Latin as candidates. At the time, all of these scripts had the same angular letter shapes suited for epigraphy, which would become characteristic of the runes.
The process of transmission of the script is unknown. The oldest inscriptions are found in Denmark and Northern Germany, not near Italy. A “West Germanic hypothesis” suggests transmission via Elbe Germanic groups, while a “Gothic hypothesis” presumes transmission via East Germanic expansion.

Runic Magic:

There is some evidence that, in addition to being a writing system, runes historically served purposes of magic. This is the case from earliest epigraphic evidence of the Roman to Germanic Iron Age, with non-linguistic inscriptions and the alu word. An erilaz appears to have been a person versed in runes, including their magic applications.
In medieval sources, notably the Poetic Edda, the Sigrdrífumál mentions “victory runes” to be carved on a sword, “some on the grasp and some on the inlay, and name Tyr twice.”
In early modern and modern times, related folklore and superstition is recorded in the form of the Icelandic magical staves. In the early 20th century, Germanic mysticism coins new forms of “runic magic”, some of which were continued or developed further by contemporary adherents of Germanic Neopaganism. Modern systems of runic divination are based on Hermeticism, classical Occultism, and the I Ching.

Sabbat (nee: Wheel of the Year):

The Wheel of the Year is an annual cycle of seasonal festivals, observed by many modern Pagans. It consists or either four or eight festivals: either the solstices and equinoxes, known as the “quarter days”, or the four midpoints between, known as the “cross quarter days”; syncretic traditions like Wicca often celebrate all eight festivals.
The festivals celebrated by differing sects of modern Paganism can vary considerably in name and date. Observing the cycle of the seasons has been important to many people, both ancient and modern, and many contemporary Pagan festivals are based to varying degrees on folk traditions.1
Among Wiccans, the festivals are also referred to as sabbats /ˈsæbət/, with Gerald Gardner claiming this term was passed down from the Middle Ages, when the terminology for Jewish Shabbats was commingled with that of other heretical celebrations. See Witches’ Sabbath.

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Sacred Geometry:

Sacred geometry is the geometry used in the planning and construction of religious structures such as churches, temples, mosques, religious monuments, altars, tabernacles; as well as for sacred spaces such as temenoi, sacred groves, village greens and holy wells, and the creation of religious art. In sacred geometry, symbolic and sacred meanings are ascribed to certain geometric shapes and certain geometric proportions. According to Paul Calter:1
In the ancient world certain numbers had symbolic meaning, aside from their ordinary use for counting or calculating; plane figures, the polygons, triangles, squares, hexagons, and so forth, were related to the numbers (three and the triangle, for example), were thought of in a similar way, and in fact, carried even more emotional value than the numbers themselves, because they were visual.

Sagittarius:

November 22 – December 21

Sagittarius, the ninth sign of the zodiac, is the home of the wanderers of the zodiac. It’s not a mindless ramble for these folks, either. Sagittarians are truth-seekers, and the best way for them to do this is to hit the road, talk to others and get some answers. Knowledge is key to these folks, since it fuels their broad-minded approach to life. The Sagittarian-born are keenly interested in philosophy and religion, and they find that these disciplines aid their internal quest. At the end of the day, what Sagittarius wants most is to know the meaning of life, and to accomplish this while feeling free and easy.

Salem Witch Trials:

The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings and prosecutions of people accused of witchcraft in colonial Massachusetts between February 1692 and May 1693. Despite being generally known as the Salem witch trials, the preliminary hearings in 1692 were conducted in a variety of towns across the province: Salem Village (now Danvers), Ipswich, Andover and Salem Town.
The most infamous trials were conducted by the Court of Oyer and Terminer in 1692 in Salem Town. One contemporary writer summed the results of the trials thus:
And now Nineteen persons having been hang’d, and one prest to death, and Eight more condemned, in all Twenty and Eight, of which above a third part were Members of some of the Churches of N. England, and more than half of them of a good Conversation in general, and not one clear’d; about Fifty having confest themselves to be Witches, of which not one Executed; above an Hundred and Fifty in Prison, and Two Hundred more accused; the Special Commision of Oyer and Terminer comes to a period.
—Robert Calef1
At least five more of the accused died in prison.
When I put an end to the Court there ware at least fifty persons in prision in great misery by reason of the extream cold and their poverty, most of them having only spectre evidence against them and their mittimusses being defective, I caused some of them to be lettout upon bayle and put the Judges upon consideration of a way to reliefe others and to prevent them from perishing in prision, upon which some of them were convinced and acknowledged that their former proceedings were too violent and not grounded upon a right foundation … The stop put to the first method of proceedings hath dissipated the blak cloud that threatened this Province with destruccion.
— Governor William Phips, February 21st, 1693[2]
The episode is one of the nation’s most notorious cases of mass hysteria, and has been used in political rhetoric and popular literature as a vivid cautionary tale about the dangers of isolationism, religious extremism, false accusations and lapses in due process.[3] It was not unique, being an American example of the much larger phenomenon of witch trials in the Early Modern period, but many have considered the lasting impressions from the trials to have been highly influential in subsequent American history.
More than once it has been said, too, that the Salem witchcraft was the rock on which the theocracy shattered.

San Pedro Cactus (Echinopsis pachanoi):

Echinopsis pachanoi (syn. Trichocereus pachanoi), the San Pedro cactus, is a fast-growing columnar cactus native to the Andes Mountains at 2,000–3,000 m (6,600–9,800 ft) in altitude.1[2] It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador and Peru,[3] and it is cultivated in other parts of the world. Uses for it include traditional medicine and traditional veterinary medicine, and it is widely grown as an ornamental cactus. It has been used for healing and religious divination in the Andes Mountains region for over 3000 years.[4] It is sometimes confused with its close relative, Echinopsis peruviana (Peruvian torch cactus).

Saturn:

Saturn doesn’t make things easy. That’s the role of the taskmaster of the zodiac. Saturn commands us to get to work and to work hard. Discipline and responsibility are important to this planet, yet if we’re eager to conquer the world, that’s okay, too.

Much like Father Time, Saturn implores us to look at the clock (its glyph, after all, is the sickle of Chronos, the God of Time). Is there time for everything we want to do, or are there limits? Those limitations are important to Saturn, and we must learn to manage them. Restrictions are the province of this planet, as is any form of discipline or delay.

The Seed of Life:

The “Seed of Life” is formed from seven circles being placed with sixfold symmetry, forming a pattern of circles and lenses, which act as a basic component of the Flower of Life’s design.1[2]
The Seed of Life is a symbol supposed by the New Age community to depict the six days of creation in which the Judeo-Christian God created life; Genesis 2:2-3, Exodus 23:12, 31:16-17, Isaiah 56:6-8. The first day is believed to be the creation of the Vesica Piscis, then the creation of the Tripod of Life on the second day, followed by one sphere added for each subsequent day until all seven spheres construct the Seed of Life on the sixth day of Creation. The seventh day is the day of rest, known as the “Sabbath” or “Shabbat.” 1[2]

Sex Magic:

Sex magic is a term for various types of sexual activity used in magical, ritualistic, or otherwise religious and spiritual pursuits. One practice of sex magic is using the energy of sexual arousal or orgasm with visualization of a desired result. A premise of sex magic is the concept that sexual energy is a potent force that can be harnessed to transcend one’s normally perceived reality.[citation needed]

Scorpio:

October 23 – November 21

Scorpio is the eighth sign of the zodiac, and that shouldn’t be taken lightly — nor should Scorpios! Those born under this sign are dead serious in their mission to learn about others. There’s no fluff or chatter for Scorpios, either; these folks will zero in on the essential questions, gleaning the secrets that lie within. Scorpios concern themselves with beginnings and endings, and are unafraid of either; they also travel in a world that is black and white and has little use for gray. The curiosity of Scorpios is immeasurable, which may be why they are such adept investigators. These folks love to probe and know how to get to the bottom of things. The fact that they have a keen sense of intuition certainly helps.

Shamanism:

Shamanism (/ˈʃɑːmən/ shah-mən or /ˈʃeɪmən/ shay-mən) is a practice that involves a practitioner reaching altered states of consciousness in order to encounter and interact with the spirit world and channel these transcendental energies into this world.[2] A shaman is a person regarded as having access to, and influence in, the world of benevolent and malevolent spirits, who typically enters into a trance state during a ritual, and practices divination and healing.[3]
The term “shamanism” is currently often used[by whom?] as an umbrella term referring to a variety of spiritual practices, although it was first applied to the ancient religion of the Turks and Mongols, as well as those of the neighboring Tungusic and Samoyedic-speaking peoples. The word “shaman” originates from the Evenk language (Tungusic) of North Asia and was introduced to the west after Russian forces conquered the shamanistic Khanate of Kazan in 1552. Upon learning more about religious traditions across the world, western scholars[who?] also described similar magico-religious practices found within the indigenous religions of other parts of Asia, Africa, Australasia and the Americas as shamanism. Various historians[who?] have argued that shamanism also played a role in many of the pre-Christian religions of Europe, and that shamanic elements may have survived in popular culture right through to the Early Modern period. Various[which?] archaeologists and historians of religion have also suggested that shamanism may have been a dominant pre-religious practice for humanity during the Palaeolithic.
Mircea Eliade writes, “A first definition of this complex phenomenon, and perhaps the least hazardous, will be: shamanism = ‘technique of religious ecstasy’.”[4] Shamanism encompasses the premise that shamans are intermediaries or messengers between the human world and the spirit worlds. Shamans are said to treat ailments/illness by mending the soul. Alleviating traumas affecting the soul/spirit restores the physical body of the individual to balance and wholeness. The shaman also enters supernatural realms or dimensions to obtain solutions to problems afflicting the community. Shamans may visit other worlds/dimensions to bring guidance to misguided souls and to ameliorate illnesses of the human soul caused by foreign elements. The shaman operates primarily within the spiritual world, which in turn affects the human world. The restoration of balance results in the elimination of the ailment.[4]
Shamanic beliefs and practices have attracted the interest of scholars from a wide variety of disciplines, including anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, religious studies scholars and psychologists. Hundreds of books and academic papers on the subject have been produced,[citation needed] with a peer-reviewed academic journal being devoted to the study of shamanisms.[citation needed] In the 20th century, many westerners involved in the counter-cultural movement adopted magico-religious practices influenced by indigenous shamanisms from across the world, creating the Neoshamanic movement.

Shroud of Turin:

The Shroud of Turin or Turin Shroud (Italian: Sindone di Torino) is a length of linen cloth bearing the image of a man who appears to have suffered physical trauma in a manner consistent with crucifixion. There is no consensus yet on exactly how the image was created, and it is believed by some to be the burial shroud of Jesus of Nazareth, despite radiocarbon dating placing its origins in the Medieval period.1 The image is much clearer in black-and-white negative than in its natural sepia color. The negative image was first observed in 1898, on the reverse photographic plate of amateur photographer Secondo Pia, who was allowed to photograph it while it was being exhibited in the Turin Cathedral. The shroud is kept in the royal chapel of the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, northern Italy.
The origins of the shroud and its image are the subject of intense debate among theologians, historians and researchers. Scientific and popular publications have presented diverse arguments for both authenticity and possible methods of forgery. A variety of scientific theories regarding the shroud have since been proposed, based on disciplines ranging from chemistry to biology and medical forensics to optical image analysis. The Catholic Church has neither formally endorsed nor rejected the shroud, but in 1958 Pope Pius XII approved of the image in association with the devotion to the Holy Face of Jesus.[2] More recently, Pope Francis and his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI have both described the Shroud of Turin as “an icon”.
In 1978, a detailed examination carried out by a team of American scientists, called the Shroud of Turin Research Project (STURP), found no reliable evidence of how the image was produced. In 1988 a radiocarbon dating test was performed on small samples of the shroud. The laboratories at the University of Oxford, the University of Arizona, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology concurred that the samples they tested dated from the Middle Ages, between 1260 and 1390. The validity and the interpretation of the 1988 tests are still contested by some statisticians, chemists and historians.[3] Professor Christopher Ramsey of the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit observed in 2011 that “There are various hypotheses as to why the dates might not be correct, but none of them stack up.”[4]
According to former Nature editor Philip Ball, “it’s fair to say that, despite the seemingly definitive tests in 1988, the status of the Shroud of Turin is murkier than ever. Not least, the nature of the image and how it was fixed on the cloth remain deeply puzzling”.[5] The shroud continues to remain one of the most studied and controversial objects in human history.[6][7][8]

Sigil (magic):

A sigil (/ˈsɪdʒəl/; pl. sigilia or sigils; from Latin sigillum “seal”) is a symbol used in magic. The term has usually referred to a type of pictorial signature of a demon or other entity; in modern usage, especially in the context of chaos magic, it refers to a symbolic representation of the magician’s desired outcome.

The term sigil derives from the Latin sigillum, meaning “seal”, though it may also be related to the Hebrew סגולה (segula meaning “word, action, or item of spiritual effect, talisman”). The current use of the term is derived from Renaissance magic, which was in turn inspired by the magical traditions of antiquity.
In medieval ceremonial magic, the term sigil was commonly used to refer to occult signs which represented various angels and demons which the magician might summon. The magical training books called grimoires often listed pages of such sigils. A particularly well-known list is in The Lesser Key of Solomon, in which the sigils of the 72 princes of the hierarchy of hell are given for the magician’s use. Such sigils were considered to be the equivalent of the true name of the spirit and thus granted the magician a measure of control over the beings.
A common method of creating the sigils of certain spirits was to use kameas (magic squares) — the names of the spirits were converted to numbers, which were then located on the magic square. The locations were then connected by lines, forming an abstract figure.1
The use of symbols for magical or cultic purposes has been widespread since at least the Neolithic era. Some examples from other cultures include the yantra from Hindu tantra, historical runic magic among the Germanic peoples, or the use of veves in Voudon.

Sirius (film):

Sirius is a 2013 documentary directed by Amardeep Kaleka, based upon ufologist Steven M. Greer’s book Hidden Truth, Forbidden Knowledge.1[2] Partially funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign,[3] the movie is narrated by Thomas Jane and follows Greer’s efforts to reveal what he claims is information about top secret energy projects and propulsion techniques.[4]
Sirius features interviews from former officials from the government and military as well as images and a DNA analysis of the six-inch human skeleton known as Ata that was found in the Atacama desert in northern Chile in 2003.[5] The film premiered on April 22, 2013 in Los Angeles, California as well as online

Sirius (star):

Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky. With a visual apparent magnitude of −1.46, it is almost twice as bright as Canopus, the next brightest star. The name “Sirius” is derived from the Ancient Greek: Σείριος Seirios (“glowing” or “scorcher”). The star has the Bayer designation Alpha Canis Majoris (α CMa). What the naked eye perceives as a single star is actually a binary star system, consisting of a white main-sequence star of spectral type A1V, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, called Sirius B. The distance separating Sirius A from its companion varies between 8.1 and 31.5 AU

Smudge Stick:

A smudge stick is a bundle of dried herbs, usually bound with string in a small bundle and dried. The herbs are later burned as part of a ritual or ceremony. Plants that are often used include sage and cedar.
The English term “smudge stick” is usually found in use among non-Indigenous people who believe they are practicing appropriated North American Native spiritual traditions. But the herbs used in commercial “smudge sticks”, and the rituals performed with them by non-Natives, are rarely the actual materials or rituals used by traditional Native Americans. Using scent and scented smoke in religious rites is an element common to many religions and cultures, but the details and spiritual meanings vary with the specific cultures and ceremonies.

Sorcery:
See Maleficium.

The Star (Tarot Card):

The Star (XVII) is the seventeenth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The pool of water refers to the subconscious or the universal. The land refers to the material world. The natural woman or goddess of Nature renews both. The two pitchers represent integration of the two opposite sides of our nature.[4] Usually divined as hope for the future, it may indicate good things to come in the things represented by cards that may be close to the star in a reading layout.
The Star represents a moment of renewed hope, inspiration and discovery. The turmoil of escape from the Devil depicted on the previous trump in the series (The Tower) is over, indicating calm after the storm. It is a breakthrough, a new opportunity to rise to higher state of consciousness.[5] It is the first of 3 cards of increasing light, indicating we may be receiving greater clarity.[6] A higher pathway is becoming visible. We may solve a mystery, discover secrets, or gain ideas in meditation.[7]
The ladder of planets by which we climb the mystical journey is visible in the sky. In the Fool’s or Hero’s Journey, the Star indicates that we are approaching the goal of enlightenment.[6]

Some frequent keywords are:1[unreliable source?]
Calmness —– Free-flowing love —– Trust
Tranquility —– Peace of mind —– Pure essence
Hope —– Serenity —– Inspiration —– Generosity
Optimism —– Joy —– Faith —– Regeneration
Good will —– Optimism —– Harmony —– Renewal of forces

Strength (Tarot Card):

Strength is a Major Arcana Tarot card, and is numbered either XI or VIII, depending on the deck. Historically it was called Fortitude, and in the Thoth Tarot deck it is called Lust. This card is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The modern interpretation of the card stresses discipline and control. The lion represents the primal or id-like part of the mind, and the woman, the ‘higher’ or more elevated parts of the mind. The card tells the Querent to be wary of base emotions and impulse.[citation needed] For example, in The Chariot card, the Querant is fighting a battle. The difference is that in Strength, the battle is mainly internal rather than external.
This card can also indicate a need for patience and calm regardless of the situation that is being or is to be faced. The imagery suggests that with patience even the mighty lion can be tamed. When in a relationship spread it could suggest that you need to be kinder to or more tolerant of a person or remind you that no matter how fierce someone may seem on the outside, there is more going on underneath the surface. That person could be you depending on the spread. Overall it is a reminder that you get more traction from a kind and patient approach, whatever the situation, that true strength is in accepting vulnerability.
In the Crowley deck this card is entitled Lust, and receives a different focus, as a sun sign (zodiac), namely Leo, implying a potency that is sexual, creative, and intuitive, which are all attributes of the element Fire. The other Leonine quality of generosity, or mercy, is also an aspect of this power or strength. There is a further connection with the heart chakra in kundalini yoga.
If inverted, the Querant is in danger of losing control to impulses and desires. Pride and unwarranted anger are also often associated with the inverted card.
Some refer to it simply as a challenging situation requiring persistence and effort.1

Some frequent keywords are:
Self-control – Being solid – Patience – Compassion
Composure – Stability – Perseverance – Moderation
Kindness – Gentleness – Slowness – Softness
Serenity – Comprehension – Discipline – Inner strength

Skull and Bones:

Skull and Bones was founded in 1832 after a dispute between Yale debating societies Linonia, Brothers in Unity, and the Calliopean Society over that season’s Phi Beta Kappa awards. It was co-founded by William Huntington Russell and Alphonso Taft as “the Order of the Skull and Bones”.[2][2]
The society’s assets are managed by the society’s alumni organization, the Russell Trust Association, incorporated in 1856 and named after the Bones co-founder.[2] The association was founded by Russell and Daniel Coit Gilman, a Skull and Bones member, and later president of the University of California, first president of Johns Hopkins University, and the founding president of the Carnegie Institution.
The first extended description of Skull and Bones, published in 1871 by Lyman Bagg in his book Four Years at Yale, noted that “the mystery now attending its existence forms the one great enigma which college gossip never tires of discussing.”[4][3] Brooks Mather Kelley attributed the interest in Yale senior societies to the fact that underclassmen members of then freshman, sophomore, and junior class societies returned to campus the following years and could share information about society rituals, while graduating seniors were, with their knowledge of such, at least a step removed from campus life.[6]
Skull and Bones selects new members among students every spring as part of Yale University’s “Tap Day”, and has done so since 1879. Since the society’s inclusion of women in the early 1990s, Skull and Bones selects fifteen men and women of the junior class to join the society. Skull and Bones “taps” those that it views as campus leaders and other notable figures for its membership.

Succubus:

A succubus is a female demon or supernatural entity in folklore (traced back to medieval legend) that appears in dreams and takes the form of a human woman in order to seduce men, usually through sexual activity. The male counterpart is the incubus. Religious traditions hold that repeated sexual activity with a succubus may result in the deterioration of health or even death.
In modern fictional representations, a succubus may or may not appear in dreams and is often depicted as a highly attractive seductress or enchantress; whereas, in the past, succubi were generally depicted as frightening and demonic.

Sufism:

Sufism or taṣawwuf (Arabic: الصوفية‎) is a branch of Islam,1 defined by adherents as the inner, mystical dimension of Islam; others (stemming from the views of some nineteenth century Western Orientalists) contend that it is a perennial philosophy of existence that pre-dates religion, the expression of which flowered within Islam.[2] Its essence has also been expressed via other religions and metareligious phenomena.[3][2][5] A practitioner of this tradition is generally known as a ṣūfī (صُوفِيّ). They belong to different ṭuruq or “orders”—congregations formed around a master—which meet for spiritual sessions (majalis), in meeting places known as zawiyahs, khanqahs, or tekke.[6] Sufi turuq/orders may trace many of their original precepts from the Islamic Prophet Muhammad through his cousin and son-in-law Ali ibn Abi Talib, with the notable exception of the Naqshbandi who trace their origins through the first Caliph, Abu Bakr.[7] Prominent orders include Ba ‘Alawiyya, Chishti, Rifa’i, Khalwati, Mevlevi, Naqshbandi, Nimatullahi, Oveyssi, Qadiria Boutshishia, Qadiriyyah, Qalandariyya, Sarwari Qadiri, Shadhiliyya and Suhrawardiyya.[8]
Sufis believe they are practicing ihsan (perfection of worship) as revealed by Gabriel to Muhammad: “Worship and serve Allah as you are seeing Him and while you see Him not yet truly He sees you”. Sufis consider themselves as the original true proponents of this pure original form of Islam. Sufism is opposed by Wahhabi and Salafist Muslims.
Classical Sufi scholars have defined Sufism as “a science whose objective is the reparation of the heart and turning it away from all else but God”.[9] Alternatively, in the words of the Darqawi Sufi teacher Ahmad ibn Ajiba, “a science through which one can know how to travel into the presence of the Divine, purify one’s inner self from filth, and beautify it with a variety of praiseworthy traits”.[10]
Muslims and mainstream scholars of Islam define Sufism as simply the name for the inner or esoteric dimension of Islam[3] which is supported and complemented by outward or exoteric practices of Islam, such as Islamic law.[11] In this view, “it is absolutely necessary to be a Muslim” to be a true Sufi, because Sufism’s “methods are inoperative without” Muslim “affiliation”.[12] In contrast, author Idries Shah states Sufi philosophy is universal in nature, its roots predating the rise of Islam and Christianity.[13] Some schools of Sufism in Western countries allow non-Muslims to receive “instructions on following the Sufi path”.[14] Some Muslim opponents of Sufism also consider it outside the sphere of Islam.[3][3]
Classical Sufis were characterised by their attachment to dhikr, (a practice of repeating the names of God, often performed after prayers)[16] and asceticism. Sufism gained adherents among a number of Muslims as a reaction against the worldliness of the early Umayyad Caliphate (661–750 CE[17]). Sufis have spanned several continents and cultures over a millennium, originally expressing their beliefs in Arabic, before spreading into Persian, Turkish, Indian languages and a dozen other languages.[18]

Sun:

As the Sun puts forth light, so it brings forth life. This planet (also known as a luminary and a star) represents the self, one’s personality and ego, the spirit and what it is that makes the individual unique. It is our identity and our face to the world. The Sun also speaks to creative ability and the power of the individual to meet the challenges of everyday life.

One’s natural father, husbands and other male influences are ruled by the Sun, as are children. The Sun’s energy is a forceful one, and in its wake comes authority, the ability to lead and an individual’s essence, their core being. Through the will of this planet, we learn to manifest ourselves in the world.

The Sun (Tarot Card):

The Sun (XIX) is a trump card in the tarot deck. Tarot trumps are often called Major Arcana by tarot card readers.

Some frequent keywords used by tarot readers are:
Optimism—Expansion—Being radiant—Positive feelings
Enlightenment—Vitality—Innocence—Non-criticism
Assurance—Energy—Personal power—Happiness
Splendor—Brilliance—Joy —Enthusiasm
This card is generally considered positive. It is said to reflect happiness and contentment, vitality, self-confidence and success.1[2][3] Sometimes referred to as the best card in Tarot, it represents good things and positive outcomes to current struggles.

Taurus:

April 20 – May 20

Taurus, the second sign of the zodiac, is all about reward. Unlike the Aries love of the game, Taurus loves the rewards of the game. Think physical pleasures and material goods, for those born under this sign revel in delicious excess. They are also a tactile lot, enjoying a tender, even sensual, touch. Taurus adores comfort and likes being surrounded by pleasing, soothing things. Along these lines, they also favor a good meal and a fine wine. The good life in all its guises, whether it’s the arts or art of their own making (yes, these folks are artistic as well), is heaven on Earth to the Taurus-born.

Temperance (Tarot Card):

Temperance (XIV) is the fourteenth trump or Major Arcana card in most traditional Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

The appearance of Temperance in a reading may suggest to the Querent that moderation is required in some aspect of life 1. Interpretations of this card’s appearance may focus on bringing balance to the life of the Querent. In other interpretations the card may serve as a reminder that a compromise between two seemingly incompatible options is often the best option [2]. The precise place of this card in the Querent’s life will be determined by other cards in the spread.

Some frequent keywords are:
Temperance —– Harmony —– Balance —– Health
Moderation —– Joining forces —– Well-being —– Recovery
Equilibrium —– Transcendence —– Unification —— Healing
Synthesis —– Bringing together opposites —- Feeling secure

The Three Secrets of Fatima:

The Three Secrets of Fátima consist of a series of apocalyptic visions and prophecies which some people believe were given by an apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary to three young Portuguese shepherds, Lúcia Santos and her cousins Jacinta and Francisco Marto, starting on 13 May 1917. The three children claimed they were visited by a Marian apparition six times between May and October 1917. The apparition is now popularly known as Our Lady of Fátima.
According to the official Catholic interpretation, the three secrets involve Hell, World War I and World War II, and the attempted assassination by gunshot of Pope John Paul II.
On 13 July 1917, around noon, the Virgin Mary is said to have entrusted the children with three secrets. Two of the secrets were revealed in 1941 in a document written by Lúcia, at the request of José Alves Correia da Silva, Bishop of Leiria, to assist with the publication of a new edition of a book on Jacinta.1 When asked by the Bishop in 1943 to reveal the third secret, Lúcia struggled for a short period, being “not yet convinced that God had clearly authorized her to act.”[2] However, in October 1943 the Bishop ordered her to put it in writing.[3] Lúcia then wrote the secret down and sealed it in an envelope not to be opened until 1960, when “it will appear clearer.”[4] The text of the third secret was officially released by Pope John Paul II in 2000, although some claim that it was not the entire secret revealed by Lúcia, despite repeated assertions from the Vatican to the contrary.
According to some believers[who?], the purported prophecies and their actual realization were dependent on the personal request by the Blessed Virgin Mary to “consecrate Russia” to the Immaculate Heart.
To this date, the formal consecration of Russia is widely disputed as incomplete among some Fátima devotees. Some claim the varying consecrations made by recent Popes are insufficient in fulfilling the specific request that the Virgin Mary allegedly made. Others consider the issue irrelevant due to the finished actualisation of the Second Vatican Council and World War II.

Torus:

In geometry, a torus (pl. tori) is a surface of revolution generated by revolving a circle in three-dimensional space about an axis coplanar with the circle. If the axis of revolution does not touch the circle, the surface has a ring shape and is called a ring torus or simply torus if the ring shape is implicit.
When the axis is tangent to the circle, the resulting surface is called a horn torus; when the axis is a chord of the circle, it is called a spindle torus. A degenerate case is when the axis is a diameter of the circle, which simply generates a 2-sphere. The ring torus bounds a solid known as a toroid. The adjective toroidal can be applied to tori, toroids or, more generally, any ring shape as in toroidal inductors and transformers. Real-world examples of (approximately) toroidal objects include doughnuts, vadais, inner tubes, bagels, many lifebuoys, O-rings and vortex rings.
In topology, a ring torus is homeomorphic to the Cartesian product of two circles: S1 × S1, and the latter is taken to be the definition in that context. It is a compact 2-manifold of genus 1. The ring torus is one way to embed this space into three-dimensional Euclidean space, but another way to do this is the Cartesian product of the embedding of S1 in the plane. This produces a geometric object called the Clifford torus, surface in 4-space.
The word torus comes from the Latin word meaning cushion.1

Totem:

A totem is a being, object, or symbol representing an animal or plant that serves as an emblem of a group of people, such as a family, clan, group, lineage, or tribe, reminding them of their ancestry (or mythic past).1 In kinship and descent, if the apical ancestor of a clan is nonhuman, it is called a totem. Normally this belief is accompanied by a totemic myth.
Although the term is of Ojibwe origin in North America, totemistic beliefs are not limited to Native Americans and Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Similar totem-like beliefs have been historically present in societies throughout much of the world, including Africa, Arabia, Asia, Australia, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and the Arctic polar region.
In modern times, some single individuals, not otherwise involved in the practice of a tribal religion, have chosen to adopt a personal spirit animal helper, which has special meaning to them, and may refer to this as a totem. This non-traditional usage of the term is prevalent in the New Age movement and the mythopoetic men’s movement.

The Tower (Tarot Card):

The Tower (XVI) (most common modern name) is the 16th trump or Major Arcana card in most cartomancy Tarot decks. It is not used as part of any game.

Many differing meanings are attributed to the card:
To some, it symbolizes failure, ruin and catastrophe.
To others, the Tower represents the paradigms constructed by the ego, the sum total of all schema that the mind constructs to understand the universe. The Tower is struck by lightning when reality does not conform to expectation.
Epiphanies, transcendental states of consciousness, and Kundalini experiences[6] may result. In the Triple Goddess Tarot, the card is named “Kundalini Rising”.
The Tower further symbolizes that moment in trance in which the mind actually changes the direction of the force of attention from alpha condition (pointed mindward) to theta condition (pointed imaginal stageward). A Theta condition (especially in waking versions of theta states) is that moment when information coming into the ego-mind overwhelms external or sensory stimuli, resulting in what might otherwise be called a “vision” or “hallucination.”
Each card in the Major Arcana is a related to the previous ones. After the self bondage of The Devil, life is self-correcting. Either the querents must make changes in their own lives, or the changes will be made for them.
The querent may be holding on to false ideas or pretenses; a new approach to thinking about the problem is needed. The querent is advised to think outside the box. The querent is warned that truth may not oblige schema. It may be time for the querent to re-examine belief structures, ideologies, and paradigms they hold to. The card may also point toward seeking education or higher knowledge.

Some frequent keywords used by card readers are: (by Joan Bunning in Learning the Tarot)
Chaos —– Sudden change —– Impact —– Hard times
Crisis —– Revelation —– Disruption —– Realizing the truth
Disillusion —– Crash —– Burst —– Uncomfortable experience
Downfall —– Ruin —– Ego blow —– Explosive transformation
Upside down :
To be currently in a harsh and chaotic situation but exiting in a good manner. Indeed you are falling but landing with your feet over the soil.
The same of the normal position but less negative because their incorrect position can block some powers of the card.

The Tree of Life:

The Kabbalistic Tree of life superimposed on the Flower of life
Main article: Tree of life (Kabbalah)
The symbol of the Tree of life may be derived from the Flower of Life. The Tree of life is a concept, a metaphor for common descent, and a motif in various world theologies and philosophies.[26] The Kabbalistic form of the Tree of life has historically been adopted by some Jews, Christians, Hermeticists, and pagans.[27] Along with the Seed of Life, in New Age Qabalah it is believed to be part of the geometry that parallels the cycle of the fruit tree. This relationship is implied when these two forms are superimposed onto each other.[21]
The Tree of Life is most widely recognized as a concept within the Kabbalah, which is used to understand the nature of God and the manner in which he created the world ex nihilo. The Kabbalists developed this concept into a full model of reality, using the tree to depict a “map” of creation. The Tree of Life has been called the “cosmology” of the Kabbalah.[27] Jewish Kabbalists related the Kabbalistic Tree of Life to the Tree of life mentioned in Genesis 2:9.[27]

Trilateral Commission:

Sensing a profound discord among the nations of North America, Europe and Japan, the Trilateral Commission was founded to foster substantive political and economic dialogue across the world. To quote its founding declaration:
“Growing interdependence is a fact of life of the contemporary world. It transcends and influences national systems… While it is important to develop greater cooperation among all the countries of the world, Japan, Western Europe, and North America, in view of their great weight in the world economy and their massive relations with one another, bear a special responsibility for developing effective cooperation, both in their own interests and in those of the rest of the world.”
“To be effective in meeting common problems, Japan, Western Europe, and North America will have to consult and cooperate more closely, on the basis of equality, to develop and carry out coordinated policies on matters affecting their common interests… refrain from unilateral actions incompatible with their interdependence and from actions detrimental to other regions… [and] take advantage of existing international and regional organizations and further enhance their role.”
“The Commission hopes to play a creative role as a channel of free exchange of opinions with other countries and regions. Further progress of the developing countries and greater improvement of East-West relations will be a major concern.”[2]

The Triquetra (aka: Tripod of Life):

The Triquetra or “Tripod of Life” (also known as “Borromean rings”) is formed from a third circle being added to the Vesica Piscis, where the third circle’s center point is placed at the intersection of the first two circles’ circumferences.1 The triquetra has been used as a sacred symbol in a number of pagan religions, including Celtic and Germanic paganism, since ancient times. Within the neopagan religion of Wicca, the triquetra symbolizes the Triple Goddess of the Moon and Fate; and also her three realms of Earth, sky, and sea. Within the Christian religion, the Tripod of Life has been used to symbolize the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit of the Christian Trinity.[22][2][24]

Tube Torus:

The geometric figure of a tube torus represented by the Seed of Life.
Main article: Torus
A basic one dimensional depiction of the “Tube Torus” shape is formed by ratching the Seed of Life and duplicating the lines of the tube torus in its design. Some[who?] say the Tube Torus contains a code of vortex energy that describes light and language in a unique way, perhaps as something of an Akashic Record.[17]

Unified Field Theory:

In physics, a unified field theory (UFT), occasionally referred to as a uniform field theory,1 is a type of field theory that allows all that is usually thought of as fundamental forces and elementary particles to be written in terms of a single field. There is no accepted unified field theory, and thus it remains an open line of research. The term was coined by Einstein, who attempted to unify the general theory of relativity with electromagnetism. The “theory of everything” and Grand Unified Theory are closely related to unified field theory, but differ by not requiring the basis of nature to be fields, and often by attempting to explain physical constants of nature.
This article describes unified field theory as it is currently understood in connection with quantum theory. Earlier attempts based on classical physics are described in the article on classical unified field theories.
There may be no a priori reason why the correct description of nature has to be a unified field theory. However, this goal has led to a great deal of progress in modern theoretical physics and continues to motivate research.

Uranus:

Uranus wasn’t discovered until 1781. As one of the outermost planets, it moves rather slowly through the zodiac. The result is that its effect is felt more generationally than individually.

Uranus brings with it a new way of looking at things, and its approach is best met with an expanded consciousness. Originality, inventions, computers, cutting-edge technologies and future events are all ruled by this planet. Uranus sees no need for the status quo, preferring instead to break with tradition and create a new mold. While the building blocks (science, electricity) are safe here, this planet would rather focus its gaze on a new world order. To that end, rebellion, revolution, dictators, an autonomous state and free will all fall under the aegis of this planet.

The Vedas:

The Vedas(Sanskrit véda वेद, “knowledge”) are a large body of texts originating in ancient India. Composed in Vedic Sanskrit, the texts constitute the oldest layer of Sanskrit literature and the oldest scriptures of Hinduism.1[2] The Vedas are apauruṣeya (“not of human agency”).[3][3][5] They are supposed to have been directly revealed, and thus are called śruti (“what is heard”),[6][4] distinguishing them from other religious texts, which are called smṛti (“what is remembered”). In Hindu tradition, the creation of Vedas is credited to Brahma.[8] The Vedic texts or śruti are organized around four canonical collections of metrical material known as Saṃhitās, of which the first three are related to the performance of yajna (sacrifice) in historical Vedic religion:
The Rigveda, containing hymns to be recited by the hotar, or presiding priest;
The Yajurveda, containing formulas to be recited by the adhvaryu or officiating priest;
The Samaveda, containing formulas to be sung by the udgatar or priest that chants;
The Atharvaveda, a collection of spells and incantations, apotropaic charms and speculative hymns.[9]
The individual verses contained in these compilations are known as mantras. Some selected Vedic mantras are still recited at prayers, religious functions and other auspicious occasions in contemporary Hinduism.
The various Indian philosophies and sects have taken differing positions on the Vedas. Schools of Indian philosophy which cite the Vedas as their scriptural authority are classified as “orthodox” (āstika). Other traditions, notably Buddhism and Jainism, which did not regard the Vedas as authorities are referred to by traditional Hindu texts as “heterodox” or “non-orthodox” (nāstika) schools.[10][5] In addition to Buddhism and Jainism, Sikhism[12][6] and Brahmoism,[14] many non-Brahmin Hindus in South India[15] do not accept the authority of the Vedas. Certain South Indian Brahmin communities such as Iyengars consider the Tamil Divya Prabandham or writing of the Alvar saints as equivalent to the Vedas

Venus:

Venus is all about pleasure, especially pleasure shared with someone else. This planet concerns itself with love, romance and harmony in our emotional attachments, marriages, friendships and other unions (like business partnerships). Venus is content to spread happiness and tenderness, all the while teaching us how to love and appreciate others and the things that we possess.

We appear attractive — and we attract others — thanks to Venus’s energy. Socializing with and relating to others are important to this planet.

Vesica Piscis:

The Vesica Piscis is formed from two intersecting circles of the same diameter, where the center of each circle is on the circumference of the opposite circle.1 Its design is one of the simplest forms of sacred geometry. It has been depicted around the world at sacred sites, most notably at the Chalice Well in Glastonbury, England,[citation needed] and has been the subject of mystical speculation at several periods of history.[20] One of the earliest known occurrences of the Vesica Piscis, and perhaps first, was among the Pythagoreans, who considered it a holy figure.[20]
According to some religious beliefs[who?], the Vesica Piscis represents the second stage in the creation of the Seed of Life, in that it was constructed by “the Creator” (or “God”) through the creation of a second spherical octahedron joined with the first. It is said that the Creator’s consciousness began inside the first sphere and journeyed to the furthest edge, where it then formed the second circle. Purportedly in reference to this, the Old Testament refers to “the spirit of the Creator floating upon the face of the waters.”
The Vesica Piscis has been called a symbol of the fusion of opposites and a passageway through the world’s apparent polarities.[21] It has also been noted as the geometry for the human eye.[21] It is also known to be the basis for the Ichthys fish, which is a Christian symbol representing “The Son”, Jesus Christ.

Virgo:

August 23 – September 22

Virgo is the sixth sign of the zodiac, to be exact, and that’s the way Virgos like it: exacting. Those born under this sign are forever the butt of jokes for being so picky and critical (and they can be), but their ‘attention to detail’ is for a reason: to help others. Virgos, more than any other sign, were born to serve, and it gives them great joy. They are also tailor-made for the job, since they are industrious, methodical and efficient. The sense of duty borne by these folks is considerable, and it ensures that they will always work for the greater good.

The Wheel of Fortune (Tarot):

Wheel of Fortune (X) is the tenth trump or Major Arcana card in most Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

When the Tarot deck is used for divinatory purposes, the cards are often laid out in a ‘spread’, and the exact meaning of the card varies depending on the disposition of any surrounding cards. In addition, as specific meanings can be drawn from the exact appearance of a card and, as mentioned, that can vary widely between decks, the interpretation of the card also can vary between decks. Some decks, such as Waite, carry a theological symbolism specific to their designer’s interpretation; yet such meanings might not be associated with other variants on the same card, and they may not be acknowledged or referenced by any given reader.
A common aspect to most interpretations of this card within a reading is to introduce an element of change in the querant’s life, such change being in station, position or fortune: such as the rich becoming poor, or the poor becoming rich.[4][5][6]
Turning point —– Opportunities —– Possibilities
Destiny —– Fate —– Superior Forces —– Movement
Development —– Activity —– Surprises —– Expansion
Sudden Events —– Speed —– New Developments —– Life Cycles
Interpretation —– Sudden Change —– Dissension —– Approachability

White Witch:

White witch and good witch are qualifying terms in English used to distinguish practitioners of folk magic for benevolent purposes (i.e. white magic) from practitioners of malevolent witchcraft or black magic.1 Related terms are “cunning-folk”, “witch doctor”, and the French devins-guérisseurs, “seer-healers”.
During the witch trials of Early Modern Europe, many practitioners of folk magic that did not see themselves as witches, but as healers or seers, were convicted of witchcraft (Éva Pócs’ “sorcerer witches”): many English “witches” convicted of consorting with demons seem to have been cunning folk whose fairy familiars had been demonised,[2][2] and over half the accused witches in Hungary seem to have been healers.[4] Some of the healers and diviners historically accused of witchcraft have considered themselves mediators between the mundane and spiritual worlds, roughly equivalent to shamans.[5] Such people described their contacts with fairies, spirits, or the dead, often involving out-of-body experiences and travelling through the realms of an “other-world”.[6] Beliefs of this nature are implied in the folklore of much of Europe, and were explicitly described by accused witches in central and southern Europe. Repeated themes include participation in processions of the dead or large feasts, often presided over by a female divinity who teaches magic and gives prophecies; and participation in battles against evil spirits, “vampires”, or “witches” to win fertility and prosperity for the community.[6]

Wicca:

Wicca (English pronunciation: /ˈwɪkə/) is a modern pagan, witchcraft religion. It was developed in England during the first half of the 20th century and it was introduced to the public in 1954 by Gerald Gardner, a retired British civil servant. It draws upon a diverse set of ancient pagan and 20th century hermetic motifs for its theological structure and ritual practice. The word witch derives from Middle English wicche, Old English wicce (/ˈwɪttʃe/) (feminine) “witch” and wicca (/ˈwɪttʃɑ/) (masculine) “wizzard”.1
Wicca is a diverse religion with no central authority or figure defining it. It is divided into various lineages and denominations, referred to as traditions, each with its own organisational structure and level of centralisation. Due to its decentralized nature, there is some disagreement over what actually constitutes Wicca. Some traditions, collectively referred to as British Traditional Wicca, strictly follow the initiatory lineage of Gardner and consider the term Wicca to apply only to such lineaged traditions, while other eclectic traditions do not.
Wicca is typically duotheistic, worshipping a god and goddess traditionally viewed as a mother goddess and horned god. These two deities are sometimes viewed as facets of a greater pantheistic godhead. However, beliefs range from hard polytheism to even monotheism. Wiccan celebration follows approximately eight seasonally based festivals known as Sabbats. An unattributed statement known as the Wiccan Rede is the traditional basis of Wiccan morality. Wicca often involves the ritual practice of magic, though it is not always necessary.

Witchcraft:

Witchcraft (also called witchery or spellcraft) is the use of magical faculties, most commonly for religious, divinatory or medicinal purposes.1 This may take many forms depending on cultural context.
The belief in and the practice of magic has been present since the earliest human cultures and continues to have an important religious and medicinal role in many cultures today.1
“Magic is central not only in ‘primitive’ societies but in ‘high cultural’ societies as well…”[2]
The concept of witchcraft as harmful is often treated as a cultural ideology providing a scapegoat for human misfortune.[3][2] This was particularly the case in Early Modern Europe where witchcraft came to be seen as part of a vast diabolical conspiracy of individuals in league with the Devil undermining Christianity, eventually leading to large-scale witch-hunts, especially in Protestant Europe. Witch hunts continue to this day with tragic consequences.[5]
Since the mid-20th century Witchcraft has become the designation of a branch of modern paganism. It is most notably practiced in the Wiccan traditions, some of whom claim to practice a revival of pre-Abrahamic spirituality.[6]

The World (Tarot Card):

The World (XXI) is a trump or Major Arcana card in the tarot deck. It is usually the final card of the Major Arcana or tarot trump sequence. In the tarot family of card games, this card is usually worth five points.

The World represents an ending to a cycle of life, a pause in life before the next big cycle beginning with the fool.[4] The figure is at once male and female, above and below, suspended between the heavens and the earth. It is completeness. It is also said to represent cosmic consciousness; the potential of perfect union with the One Power of the universe.[5] It tells us full happiness is also to give back to the world, sharing what we have learned or gained.
According to Robert M. Place in his book The Tarot,[6] the four beasts on the World card represent the fourfold structure of the physical world, which frames the sacred center of the world, a place where the divine can manifest. Sophia, meaning Prudence or Wisdom (the dancing woman in the center), is spirit or the sacred center, the fifth element. It is the fourth of the Cardinal virtues in the Tarot.[6] The lady in the center is thus a symbol of the goal of mystical seekers. In some older decks, this central figure is Christ, in others it is Hermes. Whenever it comes up, this card represents what is truly desired.[7]
Divination usage[edit]
In the early twentieth century, A. E. Waite was a key figure in the development of modern tarot interpretations.[8] However, not all interpretations follow his beliefs. Tarot decks used for divination are interpreted according to personal experience and standards.
Some frequent keywords used by tarot readers are:
Fulfillment —– Accomplishment —– Success —– Integration
Involvement —– Prospering —– Satisfaction —– Repleteness
Contentment —– Good feelings —– Wholeness

Yoga:

Yoga (Sanskrit: योग About this sound pronunciation (help·info)) is the physical, mental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India with a view to attain a state of permanent peace.1[2] The term yoga can be derived from either of two roots, yujir yoga (to yoke) or yuj samādhau (to concentrate).[3] According to Yoga-Yajnavalkya, Yoga is the union of the individual psyche with the transcendental self.[4]
Yoga developed in the same ascetic circles as the early Sramana movements (Buddhists, Jainas and Ajivikas), probably in around the sixth and fifth centuries BCE.[5] In Hinduism, yoga was adopted as one of the six āstika schools (accepts authority of Vedas)[6] of Hindu philosophy.[7]
By the turn of the first millennium, hatha yoga emerged from tantra.[8][3] It, along with its many modern variations, is the style that many people associate with the word yoga today. Vajrayana Buddhism, founded by the Indian Mahasiddhas,[10] has a parallel series of asanas and pranayamas, such as caṇḍālī[11] and trul khor.
Gurus from India later introduced yoga to the west,[12] following the succes of Swami Vivekananda in the late 19th and early 20th century.[12] In the 1980s, yoga became popular as a system of physical exercise across the Western world. This form of yoga is often called Hatha yoga. Many studies have tried to determine the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary intervention for cancer, schizophrenia, asthma, and heart disease.[13][4][15][5] In a national survey, long-term yoga practitioners in the United States reported musculo–skeletal and mental health improvements.[17]

Yuga:

Yuga (Devanāgari: युग) in Hindu philosophy is the name of an epoch or era within a four age cycle. According to Hindu cosmology, life in the universe is created and destroyed once every 4.1 to 8.2 billion years,1[2] which is one full day (day and night) for Brahma. The lifetime of a Brahma himself may be 311 trillion and 40 billion years.1 The cycles are said to repeat like the seasons, waxing and waning within a greater time-cycle of the creation and destruction of the universe. Like Summer, Spring, Winter and Autumn, each yuga involves stages or gradual changes which the earth and the consciousness of mankind goes through as a whole. A complete yuga cycle from a high Golden Age, called the Satya Yuga to a Dark Age, Kali Yuga and back again is said to be caused by the solar system’s motion around another star.[3]

Zeitgeist:

The Zeitgeist (spirit of the age or spirit of the time) is the intellectual fashion or dominant school of thought that typifies and influences the culture of a particular period in time. For example, the Zeitgeist of modernism typified and influenced architecture, art, and fashion during much of the 20th century.1
The German word Zeitgeist is often attributed to the philosopher Georg Hegel, but he never actually used the word. In his works such as Lectures on the Philosophy of History, he uses the phrase der Geist seiner Zeit (the spirit of his time)—for example, “no man can surpass his own time, for the spirit of his time is also his own spirit.”

Zodiac:

In both astrology and historical astronomy, the zodiac (Greek: ζῳδιακός, zōidiakos) is a circle of twelve 30° divisions of celestial longitude that are centered upon the ecliptic: the apparent path of the Sun across the celestial sphere over the course of the year. The paths of the Moon and visible planets also remain close to the ecliptic, within the belt of the zodiac, which extends 8-9° north or south of the ecliptic, as measured in celestial latitude. Because the divisions are regular, they do not correspond exactly to the twelve constellations after which they are named.


Alien Nation:

Amphibians:

Amphibian like, semi-intelligent creatures who have been known to attack people without provocation.

Anakim / Giants:

(also referred to as ‘Els’, ‘El Anakim’, short for ‘Elder Race’). Referred to in ancient Hebrew tradition, this race is allegedly tied-in with ancient humans who broke off from mainstream humanity because of their vast size which had developed over the centuries, possibly as a result of a genetic anomaly. They are said to range anywhere from 9-11 and in some cases even 12 ft. in height, although in configuration are remarkably similar to ‘International’ humans. They have allegedly been encountered in deep and extensive cavern systems from Alaska to Mexico, and are believed to have interstellar traveling capabilities.

The “Book of Enoch” from the Dead Sea scrolls says how these men married Earth women, who bore ‘giants 3000 cubits high’. (Note, a cubit is 1 Sacred Jewish inch, so 3000 cubits would be about 250 feet.). These people helped build the pyramids.

Origin : Nibiru, which is the twelfth planet which orbits our sun every 3600 years.

The Andromedans:

The beings from Andromoda are friendly aliens. They are the oldest race in our galaxy and are very concerned about our future. They have light blue skin, but when they age, the skin becomes more white. The average age of Andromodans is 2007 years.

According to one source the Andromedans say on December 23rd of 2013 we will cease to exist as 3rd dimentional beings, and move up to 4th dimension. They say on Mar 23rd, 1994 an energy began radiating from black holes at the base of each galaxy to help in this transition.
They say the primate race was created by the Draconians, and first brought to Mars, then Earth. Back then, Earth was closer to Mars, and covered with ice. They say humans are part of a soul group which they call Paa Tal, which were opposed to the Draconian influence and have warred with them for hundreds of thousands of years. They say that Earth will be ruled by Draconic tyranny 357 years from now (about 2352 AD) and have traced the shift of energy to our solar system, specifically to the Earth, Moon, and Mars.

The Andromodan council agreed that all Extra Terrestrial life should be removed from the Earth, Moon, and Phobos by Aug 12, 2003. They say there are only 2000 original Grey aliens, and most of them are on Phobos, a moon of Mars. (According to them most of the other Greys are clones, thereby supporting the hypothesis that the Greys are dying as a race due to genetic stagnation and they are looking for new DNA to revive their race.) If the aliens are not out of the Moon by 2003, they will pull the Moon out of orbit to “deal with it.” They say our Moon is an artificial satellite from another star system (the star Chauta in Ursa Minor)

Arcturus:

Located in the constellation Bootes (one of the oldest constellations), it is a red-giant sun. Supposedly one of the most advanced civilizations in the galaxy.. They are said to have 3 bases on the Moon and several on Earth. Source : Spiritweb

Alex Collier: Arcturians

This group of beings settled in the constellation of Arcturius.

These races of humanity are very private, and for very specific reasons do they get involved with Earth. They think of themselves as healers. They carry a strong pride of technology in the arts of physical healing, and emotional and spiritual bodies.

They have been known to intervene in the ancient past to help resolve very serious conflicts in our area of the Universe by sharing their unique ability to show others how to integrate their belief systems and feelings to resolve conflict. They can be very silent, and can and will keep very much to themselves.

They as a group, have done much to help raise the overall levels of consciousness in our Universe. At this time the Andromedans have added little more than this

Arianni:

The Arianni (Arians) are inner-earth people, they now live in the underworld (underground in Tibet), which they call the Agharta. Note the similarity to the word Aryan. Their space fleet is called the ‘Silver Fleet’. They lived on the planet Maldek (now the asteroid belt) and were the lost tribe of Lyrae.

Some sources say these are Blond Nordic humanoids who work with the Greys. Said to be captured by the Reptoids and also have implants. They are said to have a tendency to switch their loyalties between the Reptoids and the Confederations of Humans.

Andromodans say our Moon is an artificial satellite from a star system in Ursa Minor named Chauta. It was from the 17th of 21 planets of that system and was placed around a planet here, named Maldek, which is now the asteroid belt. It had nine huge domed cities on it and sustained life. The other moon around Maldek was Phobos, now orbiting Mars. The beings who lived on our Moon were Arians. The Pleiadeans moved our Moon from Maldek to Earth. Others say the craters on the Moon are too shallow to be made from a meteor impact and the whole Moon is hollow. It used to contain domed cities which were destroyed 113,000 years ago.
Source: History of the Moon site

Blues (Star Warriors):

The Blues are said to have translucent skin, large almond shaped eyes and small of stature. The main issue of their teaching was ‘persue your passion’, follow your own way, do your own thing, don’t be pressured into being anything but what and who you are.

The information about the Blues comes from Robert Morningsky a Hopi/Apache dancer. According to Morningsky the first alien contact started about 1947 – 1948 with the Greys contacting the U.S. Government to form a treaty with them. Another body of aliens arrived, called the Blues. The Blues advised the government not to deal with the Greys saying it would only lead to disaster. They told the U.S. to follow their own path. They said they would would teach with peace and harmony if men would disarm and listen. The military said no deal. So the Blues left, but a few decided to remain and stayed in Northern Mexico and Arizona and made a treaty with the Hopi Indians. These aliens are known by the Hopi as Star Warriors. Then the Greys started monitoring the Blues. So the Blues had to flee the reservations and go into hiding, and a few of the Elders went with them.

The Hopi legend is that there were two races, the ‘children of the feather’ who came from the skies, and the ‘children of the reptile’ who came from under the Earth. The children of the reptile chased the Hopi Indians out of the Earth, these evil under-grounders were also called ‘Two Hearts’.

Deros and Teros:

These aliens are rumoured to live underground. The Teros are the more friendly race of the two whilst the Deros are demented and like power.

Deros : DEtrimental RObotS : Race of subhuman creatures living in underground cities with the Earth. The Deros were once slaves of an advanced civilization which had once existed on Lemuria, but had perished during the cataclysm that destroyed Atlantis.

Deros had control of the Lemurians highly-advanced technology, including mind-rays which they directed at humans on the surface of the Earth, causing mental, emotional and physical problems. Other devices caused earthquakes, volcanoes and droughts. Their sole pastime was to annoy and persecute the human race. Occasionally, they would kidnap humans and torture them, sometimes returning them to the surface, but most often hiding them forever.

Source : Original story “A Warning to Future Man” by Richard Shaver, edited and rewritten as “I Remember Lemuria” by Amazing Stories magazine editor Ray Palmer (published in March, 1945).

According to the Department of Interplanetary Affairs the Deros are the mutated descendants of the Atlanteans. They are dwarfish and hairy humanoids, with huge heads and large glowing yellow eyes. These sub-humans live in caves and tunnels below forests and swamps, they are incredibly strong, and surface at night to capture cattle or other farm animals, and sometimes even capture humans for food. The Deros fled into underground tunnels to escape the destruction of Atlantis, and couldn’t return to the surface for centuries due to atomic radiation fallout. When the radiation finally cleared somewhat, they had genetically adapted to the darkness in the tunnels and could no longer stand sunlight!

The Greys:

The Greys are the most commonly described race by abduction victims. They seem to be abducting, studying, testing and using various individuals for reasons which are at present unclear. The Greys are considered to be hostile.

Some sources claim the Greys have a base on the other side (as seen from Earth) of the Moon.

1/ Zeta 2 Reticuli Greys

One group of Greys comes from a planet orbiting Zeta 2 Reticuli – probably its fourth planet. Zeta 2 Reticuli is slightly hotter than our Sun, but quite similar. Its fourth planet has a year that is slightly longer than ours (just over 400 days). Zeta 2 Reticuli, as seen from Earth, is near Barnard’s star in the next star system to Orion.
The Greys are said to have some underground bases on our Earth.

Their skin is grey in colour hence the name Grey (their skin colouring and texture resemble those of a dolphin). There are two classes of Zeta Greys, the passive and the predatory. The passive are capable of getting along with humans whilst the predatory ones are more abrupt and abrasive.
They are short, humanoid, bipedal beings. Height may vary between 3.5 and 4.5 feet tall. Body is thin and skinny, almost fragile. Limbs are also extremely thin and long, out of proportion to the body. Three or four fingers per hand, usually with webbing between the digits. The head is very large with no hair, huge black slanted eyes, two tiny nostrils, a very small slit of a mouth, a tiny nose and no ears. Blood is reported as being a pale yellow or whitish substance. Some have a box on their bodies, which is a weapon which blasts some type of cobalt radiation energy.

It is said that the bodies of four or five Greys were recovered near Roswell, New Mexico in 1947 by the US Government, as was their crashed spacecraft. One of these Greys was still alive and stayed as a guest of the US Air Force until he died (1952).

Subsequent contacts resulted in an agreement with the US Governmennt. The Greys would be allowed to do more or less as they pleased on Earth (such as abduct humans) in return for their advanced technology. The alien spacecraft and the (frozen) bodies found at the Roswell crash site as well as others that were recovered over the years are kept at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) and Area 51, Groom Lake, Nevada.

2/ Bellatrax Greys

These Greys originate from a star system called Bellatrax which is near the constellation of Orion . They are shorter than the Zeta’s, in fact no more than 18 inches tall. They are very similar in appearence to the Zetas but are more indirect than them, although they are equally vicious to humans.

3/ Orion Greys

These are much taller than both the Zeta’s and the Bellatrax. standing at six to eight feet tall. The Orions are less aggresive to humans but they are hostile. They are hairless with a very small nose, and no discernable ears. Their fingers are often long in comparison to human proportions. These large greys are thought to have 2 brains separated by a bulletproof bony septum, thus a bullet to the head won’t kill them. Their blood is thought to be green, and when it makes contact with air, it dispels a noxious ammonia-smelling gas which can kill a person. Some sources believe that the Greys are genetically sterile and need new genes to make their race survive. These guys have bases in the Aleutian Islands. These Greys are sometimes seen to give orders to the smaller type Greys.

Drunvalo says about the Orion Greys : “They took the sperm from the males and the ovums from some of the females, they combined them to their sperm and their ovums and put them back into the females. And when the baby was 3 or 4 months old, they would take the baby out and bring it onto the ship and raise them in test tube type situation, which is the only way they can reproduce right now. They have no ability to procreate in a normal, natural way.”
From “Conversations with Drunvalo”, a video-tape interview conducted by Auroria Genie Joseph, 1993, found at www2.cruzio.com/~flower/drunvalo.htm

Drunvalo also says these Greys are setting up their basis on Mars. He also refers to the Orion Greys as being 4 feet tall, which doesn’t tally with other sources.

Earth Greys?

Some sources indicate that the Greys may be a cetacean-based life form. On Earth, this comprises the species of whales and dolphins. Descriptions of Greys’ skin color and texture closely match that of dolphins. The stare and stun effects approximate those performed by dolphins on potential enemies, such as sharks and barracuda. Human and dolphin fetuses are nearly identical, up to a certain development stage. Some say they share a common genetic ancestor. If so, it makes the hybridization of humans and dolphins theoretically feasible.

Other Grey Types

Another type of Greys are small robot like beings, stocky and little, with a smooth rounded hat on top, with dark deep set holes for eyes and a round O shaped mouth, square breastplate with concentric circles on it, they smell like burnt match heads and have a mushroom grey skin. These Greys are often said to act like security guards.

Other variations are described as Reptilian-like with claws or preying mantis-like. There have also been many report of cross breeds that are not exactly human and not exactly Greys. Of course there may be cross breeds with other types of aliens too.

Lemurians:

Lemurians are also known as Atlanteans, Mu, and Muvians. The religious people of this race tried to warn the world of an impending flood. They went underground, and in the USA, emerged as the Native Americans. In Australia, they emerged as the Aborigines, and in England as the Druids.
The American Indians have a creation legend that says they came out of caves underground while the ‘reptile people’ were banished to underground.

The Andromodans say there is a large temple complex underwater, 150 miles south of the Easter Islands that belonged to the Lemurians – which may tie in with Atlantis. The Atlanteans were an ‘extrusion’ of 4 dimensional beings into the 3rd dimension. Some of their technology was ‘threshold’ technology, which could ‘slip’ you into an alternate earth. The Bermuda Triangle is the result of this disturbance which continues today. It apparently all went wrong because of the war with the Reptoids on Maldek. (Maldek used to be the fifth planet from our sun, it is now the asteroid belt. This is where our Moon was first orbiting, after it was taken from Chauta in Ursa Minor.)

The Department of Interplanetary Affairs says that Atlantis and Lemuria were two different civilisations, that the Atlanteans were high on technology, while the Lemurians were more interested in their psychic powers. According to them, in the intergalactic war involving Atlantis and Lemuria the Orion Empire, the Sirian Alliance, and the Pleiadean United Federation of Planets all fought each other on Earth. The Sirians won the battle

Lyrans:

Lyra is the original star of the Nordic type aliens; all Nordic types may have originated there (cfr. Nordics)

Another Lyran race is the Lyran Redheads, which actually consists of two groups: one giant sized, and one average sized.

Lyssa Royal “There is another race that has branched off from this giant race, the red-haired Lyrans. Their hair was red to strawberry blonde in color. The skin tone very, very fair; these entities had a difficulty exposing their skin to certain frequencies of natural light, due to the planet they sprang from. Some of these were also giant in stature, though there were some who were average human size. Eye color was generally light to what you would now consider green, though it is a different quality of green than you see upon your world. These entities were some of the first Lyran pioneers. (Pioneers is a very kind word, for there are many worlds that consider the red-haired ones to be the invaders, marauders and the basic havoc-wreakers of the Lyrangenotype).

Are we speaking of what their current state is also?
Well, to some degree we are speaking about the distant past as they interacted with your earth plane. These entities still exist but are much fewer in number. We would say that your closest mythological remnants are in your Norse mythology – Vikings etc. Some of that mythology was about actual Earth beings who were either influenced by or interacted with this red-headed Lyran strain. This is not a very common interaction on your world, not as common as that of the giants, but common enough to have made it into your mythology.

Did they have any spiritual or energetic relationship to the few red-haired Pleiadians? Apparently there’s a remnant of a red-haired group in the Pleiades.
Yes, there would be genetic connections, most certainly. And if there is a genetic connection there is always an energetic connection.

It’s hard to think of someone living in the Pleiades who would be violent. But if that aggressive tendency somehow channeled into other areas…
It’s channeled into excitement. The Pleiadian version is much more watered down. (We can get to that later on if you wish.) But the purebred red-head was very aggressive, violent, passionate and, to some degree, very rebellious. They saw the giant Lyran race as their parents, and they were rebelling against that idea. They were rebelling because they felt that the morality of the giant race was being impinged into their reality. We do not perceive this was the case, but this was another expression that needed to be experienced in your galactic family.

Did these red-haired people naturally evolve as red-haired, or was there intentional manipulation somewhere along the line?
There were those from the giant race who left and went exploring. The primary group colonized one specific planet and over generations adapted themselves to the planet. They adapted to the specific mineral content of the planet as well as the atmosphere; the specific wavelengths of the planet’s atmosphere caused the mutation to lean toward the more red tinge. That, in combination with the more rebellious attitude, began to create a specific sub-genotype.

So that particular race must have felt somehow slighted within the family. Colloquially speaking, did they carry a chip on their shoulder? Did they feel they had something to prove?
We would say that’s pretty accurate, yes. We say this a little lightly, but this is the story of your entire galactic history. Most groups splintered off because they did not agree with the mother group. In this way most of your experience as a galactic species is based on conflict/disagreement and the attempt at rightfulness.

[Lyssa Royal: Excerpt of “Galactic Family, An Overview ofGenotypes”]

source

Alex Collier: Lyrans

The Lyrans are the original white Aryan Race and what is left of the Aryans is the Pleiadians and Andromedans. Birth of the humanoid race has all of the genetic DNA from this area. Ancient Lyrans were the Titans. The giants Bigfoot also descended from Lyrans. All life destroyed on Lyra and the ring Nebula eye Og God.

Lyra consists of 14 inhabited planets, three planets were destroyed during the wars Bila, Teka and Merok. 50 million were slaughtered. Lyrans started the Black League. The Black Dragon.

Lyrans grew into:

Sirian

Arcturian

Antarian

Pleiadian

Andromedan

Cignus Alphan

Alpha Centauri

Sagittarius A & B

Cassiopia

all human evolution

Based upon genetically human forms in higher realms and very highly evolved Universes, it was decided that many forms of life would be created here in Lyra because it appeared to be ideal as far as the age of the Suns and Planets and the length of probable stability.

The human race would have time to evolve and create space exploration and gravitate by means of energy and spiritual recognition into planetary civilizations and that those races would in turn create there own root races and life. It was also important that these races be allowed to manifest and create different aspects of ourselves mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. Thus we would be creating diversity and expressing our own need to create.

As the human race fragmented, the races moved, traveled, and settled many different planets in many systems as space travel evolved. The human became aware of other planetary civilizations in theses systems. Different cultures meet and grew. Belief systems clashed or spread. New thoughts of Philosophy or technologies came into being. Mankind was evolving.

Moon-eyed (large-eyed) aliens:

A race of peaceable humans some 7-8 ft. tall, with pale-blue skin and large ‘wrap-around’ eyes which are extremely sensitive to light. They MAY be the same as the large humans allegedly encountered on the Moon by our ‘astronauts’ according to John Lear and others, who in turn were silenced and not allowed to tell what they saw. These people may, according to some accounts, be allied to the ‘Nordics’ and/or ‘Blondes’. They claim to be descendants of Noah who traveled to the Western Hemisphere a few centuries after the deluge and discovered ancient antediluvian cavern systems and technologies which had been abandoned in the subterranean recesses. They have been encountered mostly in deep cavern-systems beneath the general region of the Ozarks-Arkansas and surrounding regions

The NORDICS:

Many abductees have described meeting european looking aliens, around 1.75m tall with long blond hair. These aliens are often referred to as ‘Venusians’. They were first described by George Adamski reporting a series of encounters in the early 1950s. He stated that they told him they were from Venus and the name has stuck since.

The terms ‘Nordic’ or ‘Blonde’ are not exactly accurate descriptions, since only the Pleiades aliens are blonds. The Sirius ‘Nordic type’ aliens have black hair and the ones from Orion red hair.

Genetically, they are very similar to Earth-born humans. Males average up to approximately seven feet in height; females, six and a half feet. They are extremely fine featured, pale in complexion. Eyes are almond shaped, slightly slanted with a natural black liner, much like the renderings of ancient Egyptian royalty.

This type of alien is most intriguing since it suggests that the human form is not native to Earth or that we may have common ancestors. These friendly aliens usually simply observe and ask questions, without harming people.

A group of Nordic females is in command of most Terran projects. Sometimes seen on the same craft as the Greys. Their association with them is unknown (i.e. helpers, partners, leaders, slaves, …? )

Lyra Nordics
Lyra is the original star system of the Nordic type aliens. Lyra was invaded by the Saurian type aliens, and the Nordics escaped to the Pleiades, the Hyades and Vega some 22 million years ago. These are ‘friendly’ aliens (i.e. non hostile to humans). Note that some Nordics have been seen under the control of Greys, however.

The Lyrans are built in a very sturdy way, Caucasian-like, very large. They usually have a light skin, and even though light hair and eyes are the most common, you would sometimes find Lyrans with dark hair.

The Lyrans are authority figures. During the times they were most active on Earth they used symbols to depict their group; the most common symbols they used were of birds and of cats. Often throughout history they played a fatherly role, since they were very strict. You might say they were like father figures. Humans both loved them and feared them, much like they would a authoritative parent.

Sirius Nordics
Sirius is the brightest star in our sky and can be found in the Canis Major Constellation.

The Sirians have darker skin, darker hair and eyes, and are not as tall as the Lyrans.

The symbols the Sirians used throughout time were usually of serpents or dogs. As far as their personality characteristics, we would say that they were very devoted to serving mankind. Whereas the Lyrans were committed to ruling mankind, the Sirians were interested in helping or sometimes even saving mankind. They could be very zealous, and because of that trait, they often interfered where they did not belong.

Orion Nordics
Oiginate from Lyra too, probably. They have red hair.

Pleiades Nordics

The Pleiadians are a collective of extraterrestrials from the star system Pleiades (also called ‘the 7 Sisters’). The Pleiadian culture is ancient and was “seeded” from another universe long before Earth was created. They have formed a tremendous society which operates with love, ideas and ideals that we are yet unfamiliar with.

Physically they are similar in skin, hair and eye color to the Lyrans but much smaller.

The symbols of the Pleiadians were also at times birds or winged figures. They also used the symbol of the seven stars. The Pleiadians have a deep love of mankind, so often throughout history they have been drawn back to Earth in order to help humans. Not only do they have a genetic connection but they also have an emotional connection. Because the Extra Terrestrials often fought amongst themselves there were often territory disputes about the land and the people of Earth, and so often the Earth was divided into sections and certain ET rulers would be responsible for certain sections. Because of this Pleiadians also at times manipulated Earth humans.

One source says the Pleiadians started a project to contact and inspire Earth humans to take back their power and create a better reality for themselves. They are here as ambassadors from another universe to help Earth through her transition from the third dimension to the fourth dimension and to assist each of us in our personal endeavors of awakening, remembering and knowing. As this project has become more successful, more ETs have joined the group, some from other systems.
The Pleiadians say that their reasons for contacting us is that there is a chance of tyranny in the future and they are coming back to inspire us as much as possible so we will take charge of creating our own reality and change the future.

Billie Meier was contacted over 130 times between 1976 and 1982 by a female named Samjese who said she was from the star system Pleiades. She was the first to telepathically contact Meier and tell him where to go for the first physical contact. Meier had indepth conversations with Samjese.

The Pleiadians are rumoured to have a base on Venus.

Alex Collier; Pleiadians

The human species called the Pleiadians evolved from Lyra.

The Pleiadians are our far distant first cousins and ancestral forefathers of some of our races. It has been said that the Pleiadians as we know them were Lyrans who migrated from Lyra in large space stations or arks exploring young star systems seeking the potential for stable longevity.

These Lyrans would send down scout teams consisting of scientists, engineers and agricultural specialists to explore the surface of possible habitable planets and then return data and information to the motherships.

Each planet was explored and based upon its unique nature, would be developed for colonies that were then sent down for settlement. Some these first Lyrans colonized our Earth for a time, while a larger group of Lyrans eventually found the seven sisters and other star systems during the Orion Wars. It should be noted that through the development of effective weapons of war, this helped sustain them through the Orion Wars and beyond.

So as you can see the Pleiadians are very interested in our world and our races here. They have been visiting Earth for at least 79,743 years, establishing and maintaining many large settlements. They have come and gone throughout our planets history. We are very similar to them in many ways, however, they are emotionally and spiritually more evolved than us at this time. They too have gone through their growing pains, as we are experiencing right now.

They have and continue to make attempts to share with us the benefits of their experience so we ourselves don’t have to experience the same kinds of setbacks and possible destructions. At present, not enough of us are listening.

The Pleiades is an open star cluster consisting of 254 stars and many times that in planetary bodies. Many of the stars are very young. The Pleiades is located in the constellation of Taurus. The Pleiadian and Earth alphabets are both very similar. This was noted about 11,157 years ago.

The script form was developed here on Earth and carried back to the seven sisters. The original script form is the parent of most of our present day alphabets. All of Earths languages are derived from a ancient Pre-Sumerian language called Tamil which was spoken in Lyra and latter in the Pleaides.

Three of the Pleiadian star systems have human life as we know it, with the most advance system being Daneb of Taygeta. Another system is Taro which circles Alcyone. Most of the Pleiadians look like us in size and stature, build, color of hair, etc. They are also very affluent and articulate when speaking any of our languages, or discussing our sciences, history, and so fourth. We have inherited our aggressiveness towards each other from them.

Their life spans far exceed our own by at least 10 times our norm. Their technology has made it possible for them to travel anywhere in our Universe at speeds faster than the speed of light. They are capable of using our oceans for undersea operations. They are very concerned about our current misuse of our sciences along with our complete loss of our spiritual center and harmony with our sciences.

They have no use for money, politics or religions, clearly stating that the later two – politics and religions are really the same. The Pleiadians are worried that, as other benevolent races visit, we will destroy our planet and ourselves and expose their failure to help create a conscious shift.

The Pleiadians like other groups, have left descendants on the Earth in the past. They have said they are willing to help us but not to the point of changing our own evolution and then therefore becoming responsible for us as a race.

They say, that we create our own future as we go and so we need to take responsibility in correcting our own mistakes ourselves or suffer because of them.

Epsilon Eridani / Tau Cetian Nordics

The Epsilon Eridani and Tau Cetian star systems are inhabited by Nordic type aliens originally from Lyra.

The REPTILIANS:

Reptilians or Reptoids (usually the Saurians are included in this group) are said to have several underground bases on Earth, and seem to be unfriendly. Various bizarre reports can be found on these entities and should be taken with a pinch of salt! For example, it has been said that the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet that impacted Jupiter was actually a Reptoid invasion fleet that was thrown off course by a ‘friendly’ alien race to save Earth!

Description : Tall 6 to 8 foot creatures with scaly, green, reptilian like skin. The large eyes are usually yellow or gold in colour with a vertical pupil (like a cat’s). It is interesting to note that this entity is similar to what the dinosaurs may have evolved into had they still been around!

Draconians : These are lizard-like hostile aliens. Variations include insectoids (mantis-like), reptilians, saurians (dinosaur-like), and cross-breeds of the above. These are master geneticists who have been in the universe the longest. The Draconians (who now mainly live in the Draco constellation) don’t know where they came from – they believe that they are the original ‘owners’ of the galaxy, and they see humans as their subjects. A Draconian has a lack of respect for free will.

Another source says that the Reptilian race from Draco is bent on conquest, They are said to be controling the Greys by means of an implant, the same one that the Greys are implanting into humans. They are also said to be the master minds behind the abduction plans. Their master plan involves using the newly created ‘Half-breeds’ with implants to defeat the Confederations of Humans. These Reptoids also use humans as food. (Quite like the Reptilians of the TV series ‘V’)

Alex Collier: Draconians

The Draconis race is probably the most misunderstood. I have witnessed a deep respect for this race which is generated out of admiration and fear.

The Draconans are the oldest reptilian race in our Universe. Their forefathers, somewhere in our most ancient past came to our Universe from another separate Universe and/or reality. When this actually occurred no one really knows.

The 11 (Council of Eleven) have said that the Draconans themselves aren’t clear how or when they themselves got here, but what is interesting is that they declare and teach to the masses that they were in this Universe first, before humans beings, and that they are the true heirs to this Universe and, as such are all royalty.

Most, if not all, human races don’t recognize this claim as truth but, none the less, they don’t debate the issue with them either. Alpha Draconans have colonized many star systems and have created many races by genetically altering the life forms that they encountered.

The most densely populated area of sub-races of Draconans is the constellation of Orion, Rigel, and the star system known as Capella.

Here lies a very dangerous part of the Universe for human beings. The mind set or consciousness of the majority of the races in this region is service to self and as such they are always subverting, invading and manipulating less advanced races using their technology for control and domination.

This is a very old and ancient war with the peace that does exist always being tested by these beings that believe that fear rules and love is weak, that the less fortunate are meant to be slaves.

This belief system is created at birth in the reptilian races as the mother, at the time of birth will hide the young and then abandon them to fend for themselves. Most of the time they are cared for by the warrior class that uses the children for games of combat and amusements.

They believe that in their ways that if the young ones survive they were meant to and in the process they have had to fight all the way and at a young age they are full warriors, used to depending on no one.

Alpha Draconans are very suspicious of all life forms including their own, but not of course to the extent that they would be of humans. They are taught that Draconan history of the Great Galactic War.

The version or opinion that the humans were at fault for the invasion of the Universe and how we selfishly wanted the Draconan race to starve and struggle for the basic materials for their society to exist.

Therefore they are brainwashed at a young age just like we humans have done to our younger generations by all human races in the galaxy.

Draconian Mothmen : These are draconic, winged reptiles, usually tall, about 6-7 feet. They are reported to fly, but don’t have to flap their wings to do so. Their eyes are large and red and glow in the dark (they are nocturnal), and most people report they have an inescapable hypnotic stare. Merely being around these types causes uncontrollable feelings of fear in humans. Perhaps this is just how their negative energy life force manifests itself They reside in the constellation of Draco.

Three-fingered Reptiles : These reptiles evolved in a mixed 3rd and 4th dimension on Jupiter and they are benevolent beings. Very likely they originated from the constellation Draco and improved spiritually.

One woman reports having her spirit transported to Jupiter and seeing intelligent reptiles in a council of 12.

Other sources mention yet other possible origins for the Reptilians : the Altair stellar system in the constellation Aquila, or/and Sirius. Since the Draconians claim not to know where they originally came from, anything is possible of course!

Sirians:

Sirius is a star in Canis Major. Although most sources refer to Sirians as Nordic types, some sources say these beings are Cetaceans (dolphin/whale types).

The Sirians tend to be taller than we are, with larger and more fully-developed brains, and they live much longer than Earth humans. In fact, the Sirian brain has another lobe above the frontal, much like dolphins and whales have. It allows them to have stereoscopic vision: in other words, they can see inside of an object as well as the outside and opposite side in the third dimension. Also, the Sirians, as well as cetaceans, have tremendous telepathic and psychic abilities.

According to Spiritweb Sirians are four dimensional beings, originally from the star system Vega. To them Sirius is associated with reptilian people, who were the record-keepers of the Lemurians. Bit of a contradiction, since Vegans are Nordics and not Reptilians.

Ummites:

Ummites are humanoids from the planet Ummo claiming to hail from the general area of Wolf 424, some 14-plus light years distant from the Earth-Sol system, and possibly having ancient ties with the ‘Lyran’ colonies.

The Ummites are, like the Lyrans-Pleiadeans, said to be ‘Scandinavian’ in appearance and therefore may tie-in with the so-called ‘Nordic Blond’ societies

The Ummites have bases on Earth in at least eight countries. The group of beings from the planet Ummo arrived in 1950, established bases, and acclimatized themselves. In 1965 they began to make contact with twenty people in Spain. Most of these people had some openness to the possibility of Extra Terrestrials, for they all belonged to group called The Society of Friend of Space. The Ummites said they also had contact with other groups all over the world.

The Ummites say their planet is quite similar to Earth. The Ummites are extremely telepathic. They very much believe in the existence of the soul and in a Creator God. At the age of 13.7, Ummite children leave their families for teaching centers where they are prepared for adult life. They make practical use of at least ten dimensions of reality and are aware of far more. They say one of the reasons they are able to travel such far distances in such a short time in their spacecraft is that they use folds and warps in the space continuum. They have sophisticated technology, and their craft can exceed the speed of light. Although similar to humans in appearance, one marked physiological difference is that their fingers are very sensitive to light and other forms of radiation. For this reason they find it difficult to use light switches and electrical apparatus of all kinds.


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